Stand aside! I’m Coming through at 31 Knots!

WTIs aboard USS Bunker Hill

PACIFIC OCEAN (May 7, 2017) Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) steams along San Celemente Island during a Mark 45 5-inch gun fire exercise while conducting a group sail training unit exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ignacio D. Perez/Released)

How the Arleigh Burke class destroyers got their name

Arleigh Burke class destroyers are named in honor of Admiral Arleigh “31 knot” Burke. In 1991 with Admiral Burke himself present at age 90, the USS Arleigh Burke, the first ship of the class, was launched.

Burke earned his nickname, given by Admiral William F. Halsey, from the following radio message broadcast to US troop transports who were in danger of being intercepted by Japanese warships in World War Two in the New Guinea campaign.

“Stand aside! Stand aside! I’m coming through at 31 knots,”

radioed Mr. Burke, then a Captain, radioed darkened American troop transports as his squadron, named Little Beavers for a comic strip character, steamed up the slot at boiler bursting speed to attack a Japanese task force off Bougainville on the night of Nov. 1, 1943.

In a widely heralded action, the squadron covered the landing of thousands of American troops while attacking enemy vessels and aircraft. When the battle of Empress Augusta Bay ended the next day, the Japanese toil was horrendous. A cruiser and four destroyers lay on the bottom, and two cruisers and a pair of destroyers had limped away heavily damaged.

Later that month, the squadron engaged another Japanese task force off Cape St. George, New Ireland, and sank three destroyers without taking a hit. In 22 engagements from November 1943 to February 1944, the Navy said, Captain Burke’s squadron was credited with sinking one cruiser, nine destroyers, one submarine and nine smaller ships, as well as downing approximately 30 aircraft.

Burke became famous for his daring exploits as Commander of Destroyer Squadron 23 in the Pacific in 1943 and 1944. After the war he went all the way up the ladder. In 1955 he was named Chief of Naval Operations by President Eisenhower.”

[lines in quotes from Burke’s obituary in the New York Times in 1996]

The post has a tenure of two years and he served six years for a total of 3 terms. President Kennedy asked him to serve a 4th term as CNO but he felt he should retire to make way for others.

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BLACK SEA (May 14, 2017) The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Oscar Austin (DDG 79) and the Bulgarian navy frigate Drazki 41 maneuver during a passing exercise.  (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Sean Spratt/Released)

Sterett-Dewey Surface Action Group Deployment

no doubt Admiral Burke would raise an eyebrow at this

REPUBLIC OF SINGAPORE (May 16, 2017) The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force destroyer JS Sazanami (DD 113), left, and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sterett (DDG 104) are moored together at the International Maritime Defense Exhibition 2017 (IMDEX-17). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Byron C. Linder/Released)

 

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Admiral Mitscher and his chief of staff Arleigh Burke arrive on board Enterprise after flagship Bunker Hill was badly damaged from two kamikaze attacks. The attacks set the ship’s island afire, and killed or wounded a number of Mitscher’s senior staff. Among the dead was Dr. Ray Hege, the physician Admiral Nimitz had assigned to watch over the frail health of Admiral Mitscher. (US Navy photo & caption)

 

 

 

 

 

 

US Navy on patrol in the Pacific

While many things in Washington DC are in a state of confusion, it is good to know that our US Navy is on patrol in the Pacific Ocean where the US and its allies have critical economic and political interests.

 

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PACIFIC OCEAN (May 16, 2017) An F/A-18C Hornet assigned to the “Blue Blasters” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 34 prepares to make an arrested landing aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) western Pacific. The U.S. Navy has patrolled the Indo-Asia-Pacific routinely for more than 70 years promoting regional peace and security. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matthew Granito/Released)

 

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PACIFIC OCEAN (May 12, 2017) An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter from the Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 4 “Black Knights” prepares to land on the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) in the western Pacific Ocean.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matthew Granito/Released)

 

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PACIFIC OCEAN (May 11, 2017) The aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) participates in a strait transit simulation. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Paul L. Archer/Released)

 

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PACIFIC OCEAN (May 11, 2017) Ships from the Theodore Roosevelt Carrier strike Group participate in a simulated strait transit. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Paul L. Archer/Released)

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PACIFIC OCEAN (May 16, 2017) Sailors conduct flight operations aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) in the western Pacific. The U.S. Navy has patrolled the Indo-Asia-Pacific routinely for more than 70 years promoting regional peace and security. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Rebecca Sunderland/Released)

 

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WATERS SOUTH OF JAPAN (May 18, 2017) Sailors assigned to the “Saberhawks” of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 77 inspect an MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76). The ship is the flagship of Carrier Strike Group 5, providing a combat-ready force that protects and defends the collective maritime interests of its allies and partners in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jamal McNeill/Released)

 

Sterett-Dewey Surface Action Group DeploymentSOUTH CHINA SEA (May 15, 2017) Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson is welcomed aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sterett (DDG 104) by Sterett’s commanding officer, Cmdr. Claudine Caluori, during Sterett’s anchorage off the coast of Singapore. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Byron C. Linder/Released)

 

 

 

Our US Navy on Patrol World Wide

 

 

160315-N-UY653-161  ATLANTIC OCEAN (March 15, 2016) Guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94), front, steams in formation with USS Stout (DDG 56), USS Mason (DDG 87), USS Monterey (CG 61) and USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). While at sea, the ships supported a live-fire event conducted as part of the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), the final certification event prior to deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ryan U. Kledzik/Released)

ATLANTIC OCEAN (March 15, 2016) Guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94), front, steams in formation with USS Stout (DDG56), USS Mason (DDG87), USS Monterey (CG61) and USS Roosevelt (DDG80) (USN photo by MC Spec 3rd Class Ryan U. Kledzik)

 

160316-N-TH560-345EAST SEA (March 16, 2016) – Forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) conducts fueling operations with guided-missile cruiser USS Shiloh (CG 67).  Bonhomme Richard is the flagship of the Bonhomme Richard Expeditionary Strike Group and is participating in Exercise Ssang Yong 2016. SY16 is a biennial combined amphibious exercise conducted by forward-deployed forces with the Republic of Korea Navy and Marine Corps, Australian Army and Royal New Zealand Army Forces in order to strengthen interoperability and working relationships across a wide range of military operations from disaster relief to complex expeditionary operations.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeanette Mullinax/Released)
EAST SEA (March 16, 2016) – Forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) conducts fueling operations with guided-missile cruiser USS Shiloh (CG 67). Bonhomme Richard is the flagship of the Bonhomme Richard Expeditionary Strike Group and is participating in Exercise Ssang Yong 2016. SY16 is a biennial combined amphibious exercise conducted by forward-deployed forces with the Republic of Korea Navy and Marine Corps, Australian Army and Royal New Zealand Army Forces in order to strengthen interoperability and working relationships across a wide range of military operations from disaster relief to complex expeditionary operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeanette Mullinax/Released)

According to Wikipedia: “USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD-6) is the third US Navy ship of that name. It was named in honor of John Paul Jones’ famous frigate, which he had named the French equivalent of “Good Man Richard,” in honor of Benjamin Franklin, the U.S. Ambassador to France at the time. The name “Bonhomme Richard” is derived from the pen name of Benjamin Franklin, the author of Poor Richard’s Almanac.”

Wikipedia Bonhomme Richard

 

160310-N-MD297-161  PACIFIC OCEAN (March 10, 2016) The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Lassen (DDG 82) patrols the eastern Pacific Ocean. Lassen is currently underway in support of Operation Martillo, a joint operation with the U.S. Coast Guard and partner nations within the 4th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Huey D. Younger Jr./Not Released)

PACIFIC OCEAN (March 10, 2016)  guided-missile destroyer USS Lassen (DDG 82) patrols the eastern Pacific Ocean. Lassen is currently underway in support of Operation Martillo, a joint operation with the U.S. Coast Guard and partner nations within the 4th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Huey D. Younger Jr.)

 

160309-N-GW139-213 PACIFIC OCEAN (March 9, 2016) U.S. Navy and Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force ships are underway in formation during cannon firing exercises near Guam during Multi Sail 2016. Multi Sail is a bilateral training exercise aimed at interoperability between the U.S. and Japanese forces. This exercise builds interoperability and benefits from realistic, shared training, enhancing our ability to work together to confront any contingency. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Eric Coffer/Released)

PACIFIC OCEAN (March 9, 2016) U.S. Navy and Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force ships underway in formation during cannon firing exercises near Guam (USNavy photo by MC Spec 3rd Class Eric Coffer)

 

160308-N-YR245-418  EAST SEA (March 8, 2016) The amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4) transits the east sea during Exercise Ssang Yong 2016. Boxer is the flagship of the Boxer Amphibious Ready Group and is participating in exercise Ssang Yong 16. Ssang Yong 16 is a biennial combined amphibious exercise conducted by forward-deployed U.S. forces with the Republic of Korea Navy and Marine Corps, Australian Army and Royal New Zealand Army Forces in order to strengthen our interoperability and working relationships across a wide range of military operations - from disaster relief to complex expeditionary operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Craig Z. Rodarte/Released)

EAST SEA (March 8, 2016)  amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4) transits the east sea to participate in exercise Ssang Yong 16, a biennial exercise conducted by forward-deployed U.S. forces with the Republic of Korea Navy and Marine Corps, Australian Army and Royal New Zealand Army Forces in order to strengthen our interoperability. (USN photo my MC Spec Seaman Craig Z. Rodarte)

 

160306-N-MJ645-056 SOUTH CHINA SEA – (Mar. 06, 2016) - The Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Antietam (CG 54) sails alongside the guided-missile destroyer USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93). Antietam and Chung-Hoon are underway in the 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Marcus L. Stanley/Released)
 SOUTH CHINA SEA – (Mar. 06, 2016) – The Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Antietam (CG 54) sails alongside the guided-missile destroyer USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93). Antietam and Chung-Hoon are underway in the 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Marcus L. Stanley/Released)

“For they have sown the wind, and they shall reap the whirlwind…”

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Dec. 7, 1941: This captured Japanese photograph was taken aboard a Japanese aircraft carrier before the attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. (US National Archives)

 

In the articles and online discussions over the anniversary of the atom bomb being dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki by the US, no one seems to mention the following:

The Japanese attacked the United States. Not the other way around. 

“On December 7, 1941, the Japanese military launched a surprise attack on the United States Naval Base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii…”

“The Japanese planned to give the U.S. a declaration of war before the attack began
so they would not violate the first article of the Hague Convention of 1907, but the message was
delayed and not relayed to U.S. officials in Washington until the attack was already in progress….”

“The Japanese strike force consisted of 353 aircraft launched from four heavy carriers. These
included 40 torpedo planes, 103 level bombers, 131 dive-bombers, and 79 fighters. The attack
also consisted of two heavy cruisers, 35 submarines, two light cruisers, nine oilers, two
battleships, and 11 destroyers….”

 

USS W.VA aflame

Dec. 7, 1941: The USS West Virginia is aflame after the surprise attack by the Japanese on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii (US National Archives)
The attack killed 2,403 U.S. personnel, including 68 civilians, wounded 1,178 including 38 civilians and destroyed or damaged 19 U.S. Navy ships, including 8 battleships…

The battleship USS Arizona remains sunken in Pearl Harbor with its crew on-board. Half of the dead at Pearl Harbor were on the Arizona. A United States flag flies above the sunken
battleship, which serves as a memorial to all Americans who died in the attack….

On December 8, U.S. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt asked Congress for and received a declaration of war against Japan. On December 11, Germany and Italy, allied with Japan, declared war on the U.S. The United States had entered World War II.”

************

“Eight US B-29 crewmen were killed by un-anaesthetised vivisection carried out in front of medical students at a hospital. Their stomachs, hearts, lungs and brain segments were removed. (1944)

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/columnists/article-482589/Beheaded-whim-worked-death-Japans-repugnant-treatment-Allied-PoWs.html

 

The Biblical Verse is Hosea 8:7, King James Version of the Bible

information quoted on Pearl Harbour from:

http://www.nationalww2museum.org/assets/pdfs/pearl-harbor-fact-sheet-1.pdf

US Navy Deploys World Wide To Show American Power

150601-N-FQ994-244  BLACK SEA (June 1, 2015) The Ukranian Navy Frigate Hetman Sahaydachniy (U 130) transits the Black Sea. Hetman Sahaydachniy is scheduled to conduct a two-day underway exercise with the guided-missile destroyer USS Ross (DDG 71) June 1-2, 2015. Ross is conducting naval operations in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations in support of U.S. national security interests in Europe. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Robert S. Price/Released)

BLACK SEA (June 1, 2015) The Ukranian Navy Frigate Hetman Sahaydachniy (U 130) transits the Black Sea. Hetman Sahaydachniy is scheduled to conduct a two-day underway exercise with the guided-missile destroyer USS Ross (DDG 71) June 1-2, 2015. Ross is conducting naval operations in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations in support of U.S. national security interests in Europe. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Robert S. Price/Released)

 

150603-N-ZZ786-222  SOUTH CHINA SEA (June 3, 2015) An MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Warlords of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 51 returns to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Mustin (DDG 89). Mustin is on patrol in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility in support of security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class David Flewellyn/Released)
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SOUTH CHINA SEA (June 3, 2015) An MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Warlords of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 51 returns to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Mustin (DDG 89). Mustin is on patrol in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility in support of security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class David Flewellyn/Released)

 

150601-N-HQ940-035 U.S. 5th FLEET AREA OF OPERATIONS (June 1, 2015) Gunner's Mate 3rd Class Bernard Meggs, from New Orleans,  completes a daily check on a .50 caliber machine gun aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS McFaul (DDG 74). McFaul is independently deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, strike operations in Iraq and Syria as directed, maritime security operations and theatre security cooperation efforts in the region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nicholas Frank Cottone/Released)
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U.S. 5th FLEET AREA OF OPERATIONS (June 1, 2015) Gunner’s Mate 3rd Class Bernard Meggs, from New Orleans, completes a daily check on a .50 caliber machine gun aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS McFaul (DDG 74). McFaul is independently deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, strike operations in Iraq and Syria as directed, maritime security operations and theatre security cooperation efforts in the region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nicholas Frank Cottone/Released)

 

150529-N-IH037-291 CHANGI NAVAL BASE, Singapore (May 29, 2015) An MQ-8B Fire Scout unmanned aircraft system, left, and an MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter are displayed on the flight deck of the littoral combat ship USS Fort Worth (LCS 3) while the ship is moored pierside in Singapore. Fort Worth is on a 16-month rotational deployment in support of the Indo-Asia-Pacific-Rebalance. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. James Arterberry/Released
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CHANGI NAVAL BASE, Singapore (May 29, 2015) An MQ-8B Fire Scout unmanned aircraft system, left, and an MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter are displayed on the flight deck of the littoral combat ship USS Fort Worth (LCS 3) while the ship is moored pierside in Singapore. Fort Worth is on a 16-month rotational deployment in support of the Indo-Asia-Pacific-Rebalance. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. James Arterberry/Released

 

150605-N-IC565-021  HONG KONG (June 5, 2015) The Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2) transits into Victoria Harbor for a scheduled port visit. The Essex Amphibious Ready Group is operating in the U.S. 7th fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Bradley J. Gee/Released)
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HONG KONG (June 5, 2015) The Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2) transits into Victoria Harbor for a scheduled port visit. The Essex Amphibious Ready Group is operating in the U.S. 7th fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Bradley J. Gee/Released)

Orangeburg, South Carolina: Occasional Vignettes of my Hometown

I Remember Orangeburg

occasional vignettes of growing up in a very small Southern town. As an adult people always ask: where’s Orangeburg? I respond: “That amusing. When I grew up there although it was in the middle of no where people spoke of other towns in the county by saying, ‘it’s not far from Orangeburg.’

And we were the County Seat of Government! I think we still are.

Charles McCain age 8 or so in the sideyard of my grandfather's house

author Charles McCain in the side yard  of my grandfather Livingston’s house on Green Street. I caught these fish at Pinetop which my old Orangeburg friends will know where I am talking about. 

I remember:

When the Carolina Theater was in City Hall. It cost thirty-five cents for a movie ticket. A Coke was fifteen cents, popcorn was a dime. As kids we went to the movies every Saturday afternoon. (Most of us were not allowed to go to the movies on Sunday).  Often times people were working in the offices, all of which had glass doors. We’d put our noses up against the glass to see what they were doing.
When the movie was over, I would go over to Fisher’s Rexall on Russell Street and Middleton Street, go behind the counter and use their phone to call my mother to come pick me up. (Mr. Fisher’s son, Bert, was in Troop 45, our Boy Scout troop run by a great man, Lawrence Garrick).

The Stevenson Auditorium has taken the place of the Carolina Theater, I think but maybe the auditorium is a completely new building. I knew Mr. Stevenson who was the City Administrator for decades and went to our church with his family. He was a very, very nice man and had been a submarine officer in World War Two in the Pacific and had gone through some tough times being depth-charged by Japanese destroyers.

I was in Berry’s on the Hill one night with my Mom and Mr. Stevenson was there with Mayor Pendarvis and they were having dinner with Governor West who was a fine man. Mr. Stevenson came over and got me and brought to their table and introduced me to the Governor which was very thoughtful. He asked me if I was going to go to Carolina and play basketball.

“No, sir.”

(I was sort of a juvenile delinquent and smoked cigarettes and after my mother died I started drinking and smoking dope. Occasionally Trippy who reads my blog was a companion in these adventures along with…………”

If you grew up in Orangeburg with me you will remember Trippy who was a great guy and now is a respectable citizen with a beautiful wife and two beautiful little girls. I don’t think Trippy will mind me mentioning his name. We used to cut church occasionally and walk up to the laundromat in the Red and White shopping center and buy cigarettes from the machine).

https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001243005232

 

BTW, Ned Pendarvis looks at my Facebook occasionally and so I wanted to say that Mr. E.O. (as my late brother called him) was the only person who was Mayor in all the years when I lived in Orangeburg. He was a very fine man and had a great deal of dignity while being very friendly. Quite the old fashioned Southern gentleman of the very best type.

When my brother became an adult moved back to Orangeburg and was on the City Council and then represented Orangeburg in the Legislature for two terms he told me he used to go by and sit with Mr. E.O. who I think had stepped down from being mayor after 40 years or something. They would talk about the old days in Orangeburg.

My later brother only won his campaigns for the legislature by less than 70 votes each time so naturally we called him “Landslide Will.” I think Mr. Mirmow ran his campaigns. He was an attorney and a very nice man.

Mr. Stevenson’s  son, Doug, went to high school with us and is a very nice guy, too. I hear from him occasionally. He was in the Peace Corps and lived in Melanesia or some God forsaken place in the Pacific for a long time. Married a beautiful woman from there and last I heard from him he was living in Manhattan.

USCG Patroling Coast on Horseback World War Two

 US Coast Guard had among its duties in World War Two patrolling all beaches in the US 

USCG patrol WW Two Official

Dogs and their beach patrol handlers leap into action from a surfboat during a landing exercise along the coast of South Carolina, circa 1943.

 

 

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“In September 1942, horses were authorized for use by the beach patrol. The mounted portion soon became the largest segment of the patrol. For example, one year after orders were given to use horses, there were 3,222 of the animals assigned to the Coast Guard. All came from the Army. The Army Remount Service provided all the riding gear required, while the Coast Guard provided the uniforms for the riders. A call went out for personnel and a mixed bag of people responded. Polo players, cowboys, former sheriffs, horse trainers, Army Reserve cavalrymen, jockeys, farm boys, rodeo riders and stunt men applied. Much of the mounted training took place at Elkins Park Training Station and Hilton Head, the sites of the dog training schools.”

Photos and captions from USCG. You can read more here:

http://www.uscg.mil/history/uscghist/Beach_Patrol_Photo_Index.asp

When I was a stockbroker in the 1980s one of my clients was a retired pilot from Pan American Airways. He told me that during World War Two he was in the Coast Guard. I asked him what he did,

“Patrolled the beaches of Catalina Island and made sure the beautiful girls on the beach weren’t enemy saboteurs.”

“How long did you do this?”

“The entire war. World War Two was good to me.”