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Royal Navy at War on DDay

D-DAY – ALLIED FORCES DURING THE INVASION OF NORMANDY 6 JUNE 1944 (A 23848) Tank landing craft with Sherman tanks aboard head for Juno assault area, as seen from the destroyer HMS BEAGLE, 6 June 1944. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205155884

 

D-DAY – ALLIED FORCES DURING THE INVASION OF NORMANDY 6 JUNE 1944 (A 23842) Ships of the invasion force seen from the destroyer HMS BEAGLE, 6 June 1944. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205155880

 

D-DAY – BRITISH FORCES DURING THE INVASION OF NORMANDY 6 JUNE 1944 (A 23871) Officers transferring to an MTB from HMS BULOLO, the headquarters ship of Commodore C E Douglas-Pennant, naval commander of Assault Force G, 6 June 1944. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205155906

 

D-DAY – BRITISH FORCES DURING THE INVASION OF NORMANDY 6 JUNE 1944 (A 23903) Naval officers watching the landings on Gold assault area aboard the headquarters ship HMS BULOLO, 6 June 1944: Captain Sir Harold Campbell (left, wearing helmet), Commander A Kimmins (seated) and Commander S B Clarke. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205155930

 

D-DAY – BRITISH FORCES DURING THE INVASION OF NORMANDY 6 JUNE 1944 (A 23904) LCAs (Landing Craft Assault) and LCTs (Landing Craft Tank) off Gold assault area, 6 June 1944. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205155931

 

D-DAY – BRITISH FORCES DURING THE INVASION OF NORMANDY 6 JUNE 1944 (A 23923) Allied warships of Bombarding Force ‘C’, supporting the landings on Omaha area. The column is led by USS TEXAS (left) with HMS GLASGOW, USS ARKANSAS, FFS GEORGE LEYGUES and FFS MONTCALM following. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205155945
D-DAY – BRITISH FORCES DURING THE INVASION OF NORMANDY 6 JUNE 1944 (A 23917) HMS WARSPITE, part of Bombarding Force ‘D’ off Le Havre, shelling German gun batteries in support of the landings on Sword area, 6 June 1944. The photo was taken from the frigate HMS HOLMES which formed part of the escort group. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205155940

From Florida Largest Mass Evacuation in American History

 

A photo of traffic on Interstate 75 as residents and visitors evacuate ahead of Hurricane Irma on September 8, 2017 in Punta Gorda, FL.BRIAN BLANCO/STRINGER/GETTY IMAGES Courtesy Wired

From Wired:

“…with plenty of warning, as many as 6 million people could book it out of the state’s three most populous counties, Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach, ahead of Saturday’s landfall. That, added to exoduses from the Florida Keys and surrounding towns, would make this the largest mass evacuation in American history, beating 2005’s Houston-area Hurricane Rita exit by millions.”

WIRED MAGAZINE

 

wired.com/2017/09/4-maps-show-gigantic-hurricane-irma-evacuation

US Navy Aircraft Carriers at Sea Around the World

 

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PACIFIC OCEAN (Sept. 6, 2017) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) transits the Pacific Ocean. John C. Stennis is underway conducting flight deck certifications, carrier qualifications and training for future operations after completing its planned incremental availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Joseph Miller/Released)

 

 

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ATLANTIC OCEAN (Sept. 5, 2017) Naval Air Crewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Brad Barbour, assigned to the “Night Dippers” of helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 5, scans the Atlantic Ocean for threats while standing plane guard. HSC-5 is assigned to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) while underway conducting training after successful completion of its carrier incremental availability. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Shane Bryan/Released)

 

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PACIFIC OCEAN (Sept. 5, 2017) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) transits the Pacific Ocean. John C. Stennis is underway conducting flight deck certifications, carrier qualifications and training for future operations after completing its planned incremental availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jake Greenberg/Released)

 

 

 

Britain and Iceland Fight Cod War

Many years back the British and the Icelanders had a bun fight over international fishing rights and how much cod the British could catch and where they could fish. Each side had its own interpretations. Icelandic Coast Guard vessels would close British trawlers and try and cut their trawl nets.  British frigates would interpose themselves in a game of cat and mouse.

 

THE COD WAR: THE ROYAL NAVY ON FISHERY PROTECTION DUTIES OFF THE COAST OF ICELAND 1975 – 1976 (CT 227) In a near miss, the Icelandic gunboat ODINN passes withing feet of the Royal Navy frigate HMS SCYLLA off Iceland. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205191178
THE COD WAR: THE ROYAL NAVY ON FISHERY PROTECTION DUTIES OFF THE COAST OF ICELAND 1972 – 1976 (CT 226) The Icelandic gunboat TYR ploughs past the Royal Navy frigate HMS SCYLLA off Iceland. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205191177
THE COD WAR: THE ROYAL NAVY ON FISHERY PROTECTION DUTIES OFF THE COAST OF ICELAND 1972 – 1976 (CT 236) The Icelandic gunboat ODINN passes within feet of the Roy al Navy frigate HMS SCYLLA. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205191185
THE COD WAR: THE ROYAL NAVY ON FISHERY PROTECTION DUTIES OFF THE COAST OF ICELAND 1972 – 1976 (CT 234) The Icelandic gunboat ODINN ploughs through the seas off Iceland alongside the Royal Navy frigate HMS SCYLLA. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205191183
THE COD WAR: THE ROYAL NAVY ON FISHERY PROTECTION DUTIES OFF THE COAST OF ICELAND 1972 – 1976 (CT 232) The Icelandic gunboat TYR comes dangerously close to the Royal Navy frigate HMS SCYLLA off Iceland. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205191182

Londoners Shelter from Nazi Bombing During Blitz

SHELTER PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN IN LONDON BY BILL BRANDT, NOVEMBER 1940 (D 1576) Liverpool Street Underground Station Shelter: A man and woman asleep under blankets in the tube tunnel. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205194646

 

SHELTER PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN IN LONDON BY BILL BRANDT, NOVEMBER 1940 (D 1580) Liverpool Street Underground Station Shelter: Londoners sleep under a row of sand buckets and fire extinguishers suspended from the underground tunnel wall. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205194650
AIR RAID SHELTER UNDER THE RAILWAY ARCHES, SOUTH EAST LONDON, ENGLAND, 1940 (D 1605) A small group of shelterers knit and read the evening newspaper in this small section of an air raid shelter under the railway arches, somewhere in South East London. Makeshift beds have been constructed from crates and planks of wood. This photograph was probably taken in November 1940. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205197836

 

SANCTUARY: AIR RAID SHELTER IN JOHN KEBLE CHURCH, MILL HILL, LONDON, ENGLAND, 1940 (D 1431) The curate of John Keble Church in Mill Hill in London tends to one of the many shelterers staying in the make-shift shelter in the nave of the church. Many homeless and orphaned children are sheltering here. The nurse adds details to the sick bay records. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205197819

 

AIR RAID SHELTER IN THE BASEMENT OF DICKINS AND JONES, REGENT STREET, LONDON, ENGLAND, 1940 (D 1658) A wide view of the public canteen of an air raid shelter in the basement of Dickins and Jones department store in London’s Regent Street, in November 1940. Shelterers can be seeing buying cups of tea and other refreshments from canteen staff. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205197853

 

SHELTER PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN IN LONDON BY BILL BRANDT, NOVEMBER 1940 (D 1503) Southwest London Garage Shelter, Pimlico: Old lady asleep in a makeshift bed, her silver handled umbrella safely stowed away behind her. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205194613

Free French Destroyer Triomphant

A massive wave washes over the deck of the Free French Force destroyer, Le Triomphant, during a cyclone. She was on convoy duty with the American oil tanker Cedar Mills and the Dutch cargo ship Java when the cyclone hit and received considerable damage. Without fuel, water and provisions and listing 45 degrees, she was towed by the Cedar Mills to Diego Suarez, Madagascar, for repairs.

Le Triomphant, one of six Le Fantasque class destroyers built by At. & Ch de France of Dunkirk, France, was launched on 16 April 1934 and commissioned into the French Navy on 25 May 1936. She had a complement of 220 officers and men and was reputed to reach speeds of well over 40 knots.

On 3 July 1940 she arrived at the British port of Plymouth, escaping the Vichy French government and was transferred to the French Free force under the command of Commandant Pierre Gilly. She served in the Pacific after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour, undertaking numerous escort and convoy assignments. (photo courtesy of Australian War Memorial)

 

The crew of the Free French Force destroyer, Le Triomphant, race to apply a collision mat to the damaged ship’s hull during a cyclone on 2 December 1943. The collision mat, a large piece of canvas, is passed under the ship and is held in place by the pressure of the water trying to enter the breach. (photo courtesy of Australian War Memorial)

 

The crew of the Free French Force ship Le Triomphant, a large destroyer of Le Fantasque class, are presented to the leader of the Free French Force, General Charles Andre Joseph Marie de Gaulle (saluting on right) while in port at Algiers. Saluting General de Gaulle is Lieutenant de Vaisseau Leon Mequin (later Commanding Officer of the Free French Force corvette Lobelia). General de Gaulle is attended by the Minister for the Navy, Louis Jacquinot and Commandant Pierre Gilly.  (photo courtesy of Australian War Memorial)

 

 

Starboard broadside view of the French Free Force ship the large destroyer Le Triomphant. One of six Le Fantasque class destroyers built by AT & CH de France of Dunkirk, France, she was launched on 16 April 1934 and commissioned into the French Navy on 25 May 1936.

 

Members of the ship’s crew of FFS LE TRIOMPHANT in working rig, seated on gantries hanging over the ship’s side, painting the ship’s bow. FFS LE TRIOMPHANT was one of the French naval ships which came to British ports after the capitulation of the French Government and was manned by Free French sailors, forming part of the Free French Navy.

 

*Feature photograph: Starboard broadside view of the French Free Force ship the large destroyer Le Triomphant. One of six Le Fantasque class destroyers built by AT & CH de France of Dunkirk, France, she was launched on 16 April 1934 and commissioned into the French Navy on 25 May 1936