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RAF Spitfires Fighting Italians

RAF Spitfires flying over mountainous country south of Rome

SUPERMARINE SPITFIRES OF THE ROYAL AIR FORCE IN ITALY, JANUARY 1944 (TR 1532) Two Spitfires IX’s of No 241 Squadron, Royal Air Force, MA425/RZ-R' and MH635/RZ-U’ piloted by Flying Officers H Cogman and J V Macdonald respectively flying over mountainous country south of Rome. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205188815

 

SUPERMARINE SPITFIRES OF THE ROYAL AIR FORCE IN ITALY, JANUARY 1944 (TR 1534) Two Spitfire IX’s of No 241 Squadron, Royal Air Force, MA425/RZ-R' and MH635/RZ-U’ piloted by Flying Officers H Cogman and J V Macdonald respectively, flying over mountainous country south of Rome. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205188817

 

RAF Spitfires flying over Mount Vesuvius

 

SUPERMARINE SPITFIRES OF THE ROYAL AIR FORCE IN ITALY, JANUARY 1944 (TR 1536) Two Spitfire IX’s of No 241 Squadron, Royal Air Force, MA425/RZ-R' and MH635/RZ-U’ piloted by Flying Officers H Cogman and J V Macdonald respectively, flying over Mount Vesuvius. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205210937

SUPERMARINE SPITFIRES OF THE ROYAL AIR FORCE IN ITALY, JANUARY 1944 (TR 1532) Two Spitfire IX’s of No 241 Squadron, Royal Air Force, MA425/`RZ-R’ and MH635/`RZ-U’ piloted by Flying Officers H Cogman and J V Macdonald respectively flying over mountainous country south of Rome. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205188815

 

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Royal Air Force Supermarine Spitfire pilot of No 241 Squadron, Flying Officer W R B McMurray looking at a map in Italy. (Photo courtesy of the Imperial War Museum

 

 

 

 

HMS London Fights Nazis at Sea

County class cruiser HMS London at sea in World War Two
BRITISH AND US PLANES AND WARSHIPS COVER RUSSIAN CONVOY. MAY 1942, ON BOARD HMS VICTORIOUS AT SEA AND AT HVALFJORD, ICELAND. (A 9294) USS WICHITA followed by HMS LONDON in formation while covering a convoy to Northern Russia. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205143154
BRITISH AND US PLANES AND WARSHIPS COVER RUSSIAN CONVOY. MAY 1942, ON BOARD HMS VICTORIOUS AT SEA AND AT HVALFJORD, ICELAND. (A 9290) The cruiser HMS LONDON in the Battle Squadron covering the convoy. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205143150
BRITISH AND US PLANES AND WARSHIPS COVER RUSSIAN CONVOY. MAY 1942, ON BOARD HMS VICTORIOUS AT SEA AND AT HVALFJORD, ICELAND. (A 9291) A Fairey Fulmar on the flight deck of HMS VICTORIOUS with the cruiser HMS LONDON in the background. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205143151
BRITISH AND US WARSHIPS CONVOY SUPPLIES TO RUSSIA. MAY 1942, ON BOARD THE DESTROYER HMS WHEATLAND IN NORTHERN WATERS AND AT HVALFJORD, ICELAND. (A 8959) A look-out aboard HMS WHEATLAND examines HMS LONDON as she closes up. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205142867

 

HMS LONDON (FL 2968) Under tow on the Tyne. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205120265

 

 

 

THE CRUISER HMS LONDON PASSES THROUGH SUEZ CANAL ON HER WAY HOME. SEPTEMBER 1949, THE CRUISER HMS LONDON, DAMAGED WHILE ATTEMPTING TO ASSIST HMS AMETHYST IN THE YANGTSE RIVER ON HER WAY HOME. (A 31560) British London class cruiser HMS LONDON passing through. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205162546

#countyclass cruiser #HMSLondon passing thru #suezcanal 1949 in waning days of empire. Men being inspected are #royalmarine contingent #IWM

Nazi Saboteurs Landed In America by German U-boats

German uboats touched american soil three times during world war two

nytsaboteurs

In reality, the leader of the group, George Dasch, turned all of them into the FBI. laimed all the credit but only when Dasch called the FBI did they have any idea German saboteurs were in the country.

In spite of many tall tales, German U-boats only touched American soil three times and they didn’t stay very long. Approaching an enemy coast to land agents was extremely dangerous since the boat had to go into shallow water and close an enemy coast with no intelligence.

Since the only real protection a U-Boat had was going deep underwater, being in shallow water made this impossible. Officers and crewmen intensely disliked missions such as this because it put them in such danger.

Over the years, dozens of people have told me how they had heard about German U-Boat coming ashore in the US to shop, go to the movies, have a beer, you name it. Absolutely none of these stories are true. A work colleague many years ago told me UBoat men used to come ashore for an evening of dinner, drinks, and dancing in Palm Beach. His grandfather met many of them. This is impossible but stories like this abound.

I have asked the two top U-Boat historians in the world Jak P Mallman-Showell and Dr. Timothy Mulligan if any of these stories are true and they both said, “no.” And gave me permission to quote them.

 

NEW YORK TIMES 10 December 1945

Aircraft and many other key armaments, relied on aluminum. As rugged as they seem, you could punch a sharpened pencil through the side of a B-17. Aluminum production in the US skyrocketed during the war.  Because it is difficult to make and requires huge amounts of electricity, there are many points in the production cycle which a saboteur could disrupt.

USS Idaho Sunk by German Bombs

The USS Idaho was the USS Mississippi‘s sister ship and was commissioned for the US Navy in 1908. She was subsequently sold to Greece in 1914 and was then renamed Lemnos. Lemnos saw minimal action during WW 1, assisted the White Russian Forces in the 1919 Allied Crimean expedition, and was decommissioned in 1932 when her guns were removed and used as a coastal battery. The rest of the ship was sunk by German Bombers in April 1941 while docked at Salamis Naval Base.

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USS Idaho, fitting out at the Cramp shipyard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, circa 1906.

 

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USS Idaho, dressed with flags during the Naval Review off New York City, October 1912.

 

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At Constantinople, Turkey, probably in 1919. The Greek torpedo boat Dafni (completed 1913) is alongside. Lemnos was the former USS Idaho (Battleship # 24).

 

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Firing a salute to US Navy Admiral Mark L. Bristol, at Smyrna, Turkey, 15 September 1919. Lemnos is flying the US and Greek flags at the foremast peak and the Italian flag at the mainmast peak. A British D-class light cruiser is in the right distance, also with the Italian flag at the mainmast peak. Lemnos was the former USS Idaho (Battleship # 24).

 

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Sunk in the basin of the Greek naval base at Salamis after they were hit by German air attacks on 23 April 1941. Seen from the harbor pier following the arrival of the German army. Kilkis, the former USS Mississippi (Battleship # 23), is in the foreground. Lemnos, ex-USS Idaho (Battleship # 24), is in the distance, with her guns removed. Photograph and some caption information were provided by Franz Selinger, via the US Naval Institute.

[Images courtesy of the Department of the Navy – Naval Historical Center.]