US Navy Aircraft Carrier Nimitz on Patrol

Fleet Admiral Chester Nimitz

USS Nimitz on patrol in the Pacific. Named for our greatest admiral, Chester W. Nimitz, Commander-in-Chief US Navy Pacific fleet in World War Two. Fleet Admiral Nimitz led US naval forces to victory over Japan. Nimitz class carriers are the largest warships in the world.

 

The surrender of Japan aboard USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay, September 2, 1945: Fleet Admiral Chester Nimitz, representing the United States, signs the instrument of surrender.

 

An F/A-18E Super Hornet launches from the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz.

USS Nimitz in the Pacific Ocean.

 An F/A-18E Super Hornet launches off the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68).

Admiral Chester W. Nimitz pins Navy Cross on Doris Miller, at a ceremony on board the USS Enterprise (CV-6) at Pearl Harbor, May 27, 1942. Miller was the first African-American to be awarded the US Navy Cross, the second highest decoration of the US Navy.  

The citation for the medal says Miller was recognized for his “distinguished devotion to duty, extraordinary courage and disregard for his own personal safety during the attack on the Fleet in Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, by Japanese forces on December 7, 1941. 

Damn the Torpedoes! Full Speed Ahead!

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statue of Admiral David Glasgow Farragut in the middle of Farragut Square in Washington DC.

(photo courtesy of US National Park Service)

This statue of Admiral David Glasgow Farragut forms the centerpiece of Farragut Square in Washington, DC. Farragut was a renown naval commander, with many of his accomplishments occurring during the Civil War. Although he was from Tennessee, he stayed loyal to the Union.

He was the first Admiral in the US Navy.

Among his famous accomplishments was running the Confederate defenses of Mobile Bay on 5 August 1864. As Farragut led his fleet into the Bay, a lookout on the bow saw clusters of primitive sea mines, then known as ‘torpedoes,’ floating just beneath the surface of the water.
“Torpedoes ahead!” the lookout shouted.
Upon hearing this warning, Admiral Farragut, leading his fleet of Union ships aboard his flagship, USS Hartford, bellowed out his famous order, “Damn the torpedoes. Full speed ahead!”
The statue is cast in bronze which came from one of the bronze propellers of his flagship. The sculptor was Vinnie Ream, the first woman ever to receive a commission from the Federal Government to sculpt a statue.

 

Source: Testament to Union: Civil War Monuments in Washington, DC by Kathryn Allamong Jacob. Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998.

Commander-in-Chief Franklin Roosevelt in Alaska

 

 

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Franklin D. Roosevelt in the Quonset hut mess hall in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska.

August 3, 1944
FDR Library Photo Collection. NPx. 48-22:3868(497).

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Franklin D. Roosevelt fishing at Kodiak Island, Alaska.
August 7, 1944
FDR Library Photo Collection. NPx. 48-22:3868(498).

Disaster Relief

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PACIFIC OCEAN (March 20, 2011) An SH-60 Sea Hawk helicopter flies toward the Ticonderoga class guided-missile cruiser USS Shiloh (CG 67) during flight operations. Shiloh is at sea east of the Miyagi Prefecture of Japan to provide disaster relief and humanitarian assistance to Japan in support of Operation Tomodachi. (US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class William Pittman/Released)

[Image courtesy of the US Navy Website.]