Tagged: Spanish Influenza

The Spanish Flu Pandemic Killed Far More People Than Died in World War One

Letter carrier in New York wearing mask for protection against influenza. New York City, October 16, 1918. (photo and quote below courtesy of US National Archives) Letter carriers, mass transit workers, and others who came in contact with the public, were especially vulnerable to disease. Wearing a face mask helped them avoid contagion. Typist wearing mask, New York City, October 16, 1918 (Photo courtesy US National Archives) There was great fear of the disease as you might imagine. Even people in the pink of health often died within hours of the onset of symptoms. People were refused entrance...

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The Spanish Influenza – Did It Start in America?

  +   Although the influenza epidemic killed millions worldwide, it has forever been known as the “Spanish Influenza” pandemic. There are several theories about this. Writing in America’s Forgotten Pandemic: the Influenza of 1918 (3 stars, slightly dated as it was originally published in the 1970s) by Alfred W. Crosby, the author speculates that in Spain, a neutral power during the war, strict military censorship of Spanish newspapers wasn’t being exercised, hence the news of the pandemic first appeared in Spain thus giving the epidemic its name. This is confirmed by an abstract from a 2008 article...

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The Spanish Influenza – Did It Kill 6% of the Population of the Earth?

        So why are physicians and medical researchers from all sorts of disciplines in many countries spending time and money on researching a pandemic that happened almost one hundred years ago? Because it is still with us in various, albeit less lethal strains, and because the Spanish flu had a vastly higher death rate than any other flu. The following statistics are from a scientific paper, “1918 Influenza:The Mother of All Pandemics” published in Emerging Infectious Diseases Vol. 12, No. 1, January 2006. The impact of this pandemic was not limited to 1918–1919. All influenza...

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Spanish Influenza Epidemic of 1919 Killed 675,000 in United States

Washington, D.C., circa 1919. “Walter Reed Hospital flu ward.” One of the very few images in Washington-area photo archives documenting the influenza contagion of 1918-1919, which killed over 500,000 Americans and tens of millions around the globe. Harris & Ewing glass negative. The flushing of streets and sewers by sprinkler trucks was a widespread if not terribly effective public-health measure during the “Spanish influenza” epidemic of the late teens. LOC San Francisco circa 1919. “Nash Two-Ton Tanker Truck.” This begins a new series of photos, scanned by Shorpy from large-format negatives taken by or for Christopher Helin, travel...

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The Spanish Influenza – Why Medical Researchers Continue Their Investigation To This Day

+ Research into the Spanish Flu began in the early 1900s Part 1 – Part 2 – Part 3 So why are physicians and medical researchers from all sorts of disciplines in many countries spending time and money on researching a pandemic that happened almost one hundred years ago? Because it is still with us in various, albeit less lethal strains, and because the Spanish flu had a vastly higher death rate than any other flu. The following statistics are from a scientific paper, “1918 Influenza:The Mother of All Pandemics” published in Emerging Infectious Diseases Vol. 12, No....

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The Spanish Influenza – It Started in Great Britain (We’re Almost Certain Not Quite)

Part 1 – Part 2 So we know the Spanish Influenza began in America. But not so fast. Highly respected scientific sources do not agree that the terrible pandemic started in the United States. Writing in the British medical journal Lancet (abstract available here) in 2002, medical researchers state: We deduce that early focal outbreaks of influenza-like disease occurred in Europe and on the balance of probability the Great Pandemic was not initiated in Spain in 1918 but in another European country in the winter of 1916 or 1917. We suggest that the pandemic had its origins on...

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The Spanish Influenza – Did It Start in America?

+ Part 1 Although the influenza epidemic killed millions worldwide, it has forever been known as the “Spanish Influenza” pandemic. There are several theories about this. Writing in America’s Forgotten Pandemic: the Influenza of 1918 (3 stars, slightly dated as it was originally published in the 1970s) by Alfred W. Crosby, the author speculates that in Spain, a neutral power during the war, strict military censorship of Spanish newspapers wasn’t being exercised, hence the news of the pandemic first appeared in Spain thus giving the epidemic its name. This is confirmed by an abstract from a 2008 article...

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Incompetence, Stupidity, and Cowardice: The Royal House of Savoy and the Governance of Italy, 1861-1946

Part 1 – Part 2 – Part 3 – Part 4 – Part 5 – Part 6 – Part 7 – Part 8 – Part 9 – Part 10 – Part 11 – Part 12 – Part 13 – Part 14 – Part 15 – Part 16 – Part 17 – Part 18 – Part 19 – Part 20 – Part 21 – Part 22 – Part 23 – Part 24 PART 9 World War One wasn’t the nation building exercise the elites hoped it would be. And while the soldiers may have shouted “savoia” as their battle...

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