The Massive Work That Goes Into Remodeling an Old Aircraft Carrier

from Wired Magazine 

by Kathertine Kornri

 

USS-Abraham-Lincoln-06-2011

F/A-18C Hornets assigned to the Vigilantes of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 151 fly in formation above the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). Official US Navy Photo

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIERS ARE complicated. They’re floating cities and mobile airbases, housing thousands of sailors and airmen, tens of aircraft, multiple nuclear reactors, and their own hospitals, barbershops, chapels, and zip codes. Carriers support defense and humanitarian efforts worldwide and can travel upwards of 100,000 nautical miles each year. Each United States aircraft carrier—there are 10 in active service—is designed to last 50 years. But the only way they get there is with a massive remodeling effort conducted once in the middle of its lifespan to update its technology and infrastructure.

Because “remodeling” is a term more often applied to home kitchens and bathrooms, the multi-year, multi-billion dollar process of modernizing the ship and readying it for at least two more decades of service is called Refueling Complex Overhaul (RCOH).

US Navy sailors and shipyard workers work together to update, clean, and restore nearly every square foot of a carrier: They refuel the nuclear reactors, overhaul living spaces, replace catapult systems used to launch aircraft, and repaint the hull, among other things.

In 2013, the ship was placed in drydock in Newport News, Virginia, the same shipyard that laid down its keel in 1984. “We have dozens of shipbuilders that worked on Lincoln during new construction 25 years ago who are working on the RCOH. These shipbuilders have a level of expertise and a bond with the ship that you cannot find anywhere else in the world,” says Bruce Easterson, construction director of Newport News Shipbuilding.”‘

the rest of the article is here:

http://www.wired.com/2015/02/massive-work-goes-remodeling-old-aircraft-carrier/

 

150827-N-IJ275-015  NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (Aug. 27, 2015) Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Casey Boatner participates in pipe patching training aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). Abraham Lincoln is undergoing a refueling and complex overhaul at Newport News Shipbuilding, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ciarra C. Thibodeaux/Released)

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (Aug. 27, 2015) Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Casey Boatner participates in pipe patching training aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). Abraham Lincoln is undergoing a refueling and complex overhaul at Newport News Shipbuilding, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ciarra C. Thibodeaux/Released)

 

Collision Course with a Hurricane: How Doomed US Ship Met its End

EL FARO

SS El Faro

from Marine Link webzine:
“The ill-fated U.S.-flagged El Faro cargo ship sunk by Hurricane Joaquin was sailing at near full speed into the center of the storm before it lost propulsion amid mountainous waves and brutal winds, according to ship tracking data.

The data on Thomson Reuters Eikon raises questions about the ship owner’s assertion that the vessel’s captain had chosen a “sound plan” to pass around Joaquin “with a margin of comfort” but was then thwarted by engineering problems. It shows that even before the ship lost power it was in stormy waters that many mariners interviewed said they would never have entered.

After reviewing the data, Klaus Luhta, a former ship’s officer and chief of staff at the International Organization of Masters, Mates, and Pilots, went silent for a moment as he contemplated what has been called the worst cargo shipping disaster involving a U.S.-flagged vessel in more than 30 years.

“I don’t know what he was thinking – I can’t even speculate,” said Luhta in a telephone interview. “He headed right into the track.”

You can read the rest of the story by clicking here:

http://www.marinelink.com/news/collision-hurricane399112.aspx

The U-Boats Are Out! German Film Poster from 1917

 

uboat heraus

poster and description courtesy of the Imperial War Museum

“This German film poster publicises a version of the first U-boat propaganda film released by Bufa (Königliche Bild- und Film-Amt) early in 1917. Widespread stories of the exploits of the auxiliary cruiser/commerce raider ‘Möwe’ had alerted the German public to the abilities of this new marine technology. Erdt’s poster design offers the U-boat commander as a new kind of hero who is in control of his vessel and of the battle, manipulating events from a hidden underwater perspective. In fact, the majority of confrontations occurred when the submarine was on the surface. Submarine technology was not advanced and the vessels could not stay underwater for long periods. This and the shorter version of the film (‘Ein Besuch bei unseren Blaujacken’) paved the way for the extraordinary film ‘Der magische Gürtel’, promoting the effectiveness of submarine warfare to both the German public and to audiences in friendly and neutral countries. Hans Rudi Erdt designed a number of film posters for Bufa which exhibit a confident graphic expertise. In common with German poster designers of the period he combines hand-drawn lettering and bold areas of flat colour, integrating image and text into one message. This particular poster, where the ‘U’ is both part of the text and fundamental to the design, is an elegant example of his work.”

“Image: Within the shape of a large black letter ‘U’ emerge the head and shoulders of a U-boat commander, identified by his cap and jacket, who peers into the sights of a periscope toward the right of the poster. Beneath and beyond the ‘U’ shape are grey waves. On the horizon is the dark outline of a ship, broken in two and sinking, a cloud of white smoke rising from the wreck. Behind it can be traced the pale outline of another vessel. text: U BOOTE HERAUS! [The U-boats are out!] H R ERDT. Hollerbaum & Schmidt, Berlin.”

 

http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/8638

“For they have sown the wind, and they shall reap the whirlwind…”

ww2-124

Dec. 7, 1941: This captured Japanese photograph was taken aboard a Japanese aircraft carrier before the attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. (US National Archives)

 

In the articles and online discussions over the anniversary of the atom bomb being dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki by the US, no one seems to mention the following:

The Japanese attacked the United States. Not the other way around. 

“On December 7, 1941, the Japanese military launched a surprise attack on the United States Naval Base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii…”

“The Japanese planned to give the U.S. a declaration of war before the attack began
so they would not violate the first article of the Hague Convention of 1907, but the message was
delayed and not relayed to U.S. officials in Washington until the attack was already in progress….”

“The Japanese strike force consisted of 353 aircraft launched from four heavy carriers. These
included 40 torpedo planes, 103 level bombers, 131 dive-bombers, and 79 fighters. The attack
also consisted of two heavy cruisers, 35 submarines, two light cruisers, nine oilers, two
battleships, and 11 destroyers….”

 

USS W.VA aflame

Dec. 7, 1941: The USS West Virginia is aflame after the surprise attack by the Japanese on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii (US National Archives)
The attack killed 2,403 U.S. personnel, including 68 civilians, wounded 1,178 including 38 civilians and destroyed or damaged 19 U.S. Navy ships, including 8 battleships…

The battleship USS Arizona remains sunken in Pearl Harbor with its crew on-board. Half of the dead at Pearl Harbor were on the Arizona. A United States flag flies above the sunken
battleship, which serves as a memorial to all Americans who died in the attack….

On December 8, U.S. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt asked Congress for and received a declaration of war against Japan. On December 11, Germany and Italy, allied with Japan, declared war on the U.S. The United States had entered World War II.”

************

“Eight US B-29 crewmen were killed by un-anaesthetised vivisection carried out in front of medical students at a hospital. Their stomachs, hearts, lungs and brain segments were removed. (1944)

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/columnists/article-482589/Beheaded-whim-worked-death-Japans-repugnant-treatment-Allied-PoWs.html

 

The Biblical Verse is Hosea 8:7, King James Version of the Bible

information quoted on Pearl Harbour from:

http://www.nationalww2museum.org/assets/pdfs/pearl-harbor-fact-sheet-1.pdf

Queen Elizabeth II, senior royals mark 75th anniversary Battle of Britain

559ff319ce5d0.image

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, fourth left, waves beside from left, Sophie Countess of Wessex, Prince Edward, Prince William and her husband Prince Philip after they watched a Royal Air Force flypast to mark the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Britain from a balcony at Buckingham Palace, in London, Friday, July 10, 2015. On July 10, 1940, during World War II, the Battle of Britain began as the Luftwaffe started attacking southern England. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

LONDON (AP) — Queen Elizabeth II and other royals have watched from the balcony of Buckingham Palace balcony as vintage aircraft flew overhead to mark the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Britain.
Spitfires and Hurricanes from World War II flew along with modern counterparts Friday as six elderly veteran pilots joined the royals for the ceremony.

The 10th of July is widely viewed as the start of the famous air battle because of a series of Luftwaffe attacks on shipping convoys off the British coast on that day in 1940.

The British eventually beat back the German air forces, dealing the Nazis their first significant defeat.
The queen was joined by her husband, Prince Philip, her sons Prince Edward and Prince Andrew, grandson Prince William and other royals on the balcony.

posted by author Charles McCain

https://www.charlesmccain.com

BBC Reports Restored World War Two Spitfire sold for £3.1m

 

Iconic RAF Spitfire

Spitfire Mark VB, R6923 ‘QJ-S’, of No 92 Squadron RAF based at Biggin Hill, Kent, banking towards the photographing aircraft.  It was shot down over the sea by a Messerschmitt Bf 109 on 22 June 1941.(Photo courtesy of the Imperial War Museum. Posted by author Charles McCain).
Spitfire Mark VB, R6923 ‘QJ-S’, of No 92 Squadron RAF based at Biggin Hill, Kent, banking towards the photographing aircraft. It was shot down over the sea by a Messerschmitt Bf 109 on 22 June 1941.(Photo courtesy of the Imperial War Museum. Posted by author Charles McCain).

 

From the BBC

An RAF World War Two Spitfire painstakingly restored over five years, has sold for £3.1m at auction.
The airworthy fighter, based at Imperial War Museum Duxford, is one of only two left in the world to have been restored to its original specification. The aircraft was shot down over Calais in 1940 and discovered when its wreckage was exposed by the tide.

Remainder of the story is here:

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-cambridgeshire-33472028

 

posted by author Charles McCain

https://www.charlesmccain.com