Mississippi Given to Greeks Bombed by Germans

The USS Mississippi was the first battleship of her class and was commissioned for the US Navy in 1908. She was subsequently sold to Greece in 1914 and was then renamed Kilkis. Kilkis saw minimal action during WW 1, assisted the White Russian Forces in the 1919 Allied Crimean expedition, and became a naval artillery training ship in 1935. She was sunk by German Bombers in April 1941 while docked at Salamis Naval Base.

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Dressed with flags, off Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, during Founders’ Week, 1908. Note motor launch off the starboard quarter, with Mississippi’s name painted on its stern, and the ship’s name in large letters atop the after superstructure.

 

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View on the foredeck, looking aft, with the forward 12″/45 gun turret trained to starboard, 1908. Note: anchor chain and capstans; hatches; bridge structure with ship’s bell attached below its forward end. Photographed by Enrique Muller.

 

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View looking forward from the ship’s port bridge wing, 1908. Note the 12″/45 gun turret with grating hatches open; also winch and capstans, with decorated tops on the latter. An old fortification is in the left distance. Photographed by Enrique Muller.

Under attack by German JU 87 dive bombers, at the Greek naval base at Salamis, 23 April 1941. In the lower left, in the floating drydock, is the destroyer Vasilefs Georgios. Kilkis, the former USS Mississippi (Battleship # 23), was sunk in this attack. The floating dock and destroyer were also sunk (reportedly on 20 April ?), but Vasilefs Georgios was subsequently raised and placed in service by the German Navy as Hermes (ZG-3). Photograph and some caption information were provided by Franz Selinger.

 

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Sunk at the Greek naval base at Salamis, after she was hit by German air attacks on 23 April 1941. Photographed from a German Heinkel HE 60 seaplane after the base was occupied by the German Army. Note bomb damage to the nearby pier. Kilkis was the former USS Mississippi (Battleship # 23). Photograph and some caption information were provided by Franz Selinger.
Lots of American naval ships end up in foreign navies.

[Images courtesy of the DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY — NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER.]

Mississippi Finally Outlaws Slavery in 1995

The 13th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America is straightforward:

Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.

The meaning is clear. The amendment outlaws slavery. It was passed by the Congress and sent to the states on 31 January 1865 and ratified by a sufficient number of states that it took effect on 6 December 1865.

The last state to ratify this amendment was Mississippi whose state legislature finally found the political courage to agree that slavery really should be illegal on 16 March 1995.

(Sources: 13th Amendment and Wikipedia.)

Bravo Zulu to the US Navy SEALS for taking down Bin Laden

(Bravo Zulu is an unofficial flag hoist of the US Navy meaning “well done.”)

The US Navy SEALS are the very tip of the spear of our armed forces and protect the United States and the free world from those who wish us harm. They truly preserve the freedoms of Western Civilization. Because of the secrecy surrounding them, a number of these men have died unknown deaths while fighting the enemy. We owe them a lot. God Bless Them.

An “elite among the elite” are members of the highly secret “SEAL Team Six.” The US Government does not acknowledge that such a group exists. According to the New York Times, approximately 24 men from that unit were the warriors who went into the compound and killed Bin Laden.

According to Lt. Cmdr. Thomas Rancich, US Navy SEALS (ret), a very good book about the making of US Navy SEALS is The Only Easy Day Was Yesterday: Making Navy SEALs by Richard D. Schoenberg.

If you would like additional information about the vaunted US Navy SEALS then visit this site hosted by Thomas Rancich. Tom spent almost 20 years in the SEALS so the books and websites he recommends come from someone who really knows what he is talking about.

Below are a variety of pictures of the SEALS in action.

CORONADO, Calif. (Oct. 28,2010) Students in Sea Air and Land (SEAL) qualification training navigate the surf off the cost of Coronado during a maritime operations training exercise. The 26-week program takes students from a very basic level, to a more advanced degree of technical and tactical operations. The Navy SEALs are the maritime component of U.S. Special Operations Forces and are trained to conduct a variety of operations from the sea, air and land. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Blake Midnight/Released)

STENNIS SPACE CENTER, Miss. (Oct. 25, 2010) Navy SEALs conduct immediate action drills at the John C. Stennis Space Center. The drills are a part of the SEALs pre-deployment training. Navy SEALs are the maritime component of U.S. Special Operations Command and are trained to conduct a variety of operations from the sea, air and land. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eddie Harrison/Released)

STENNIS SPACE CENTER, Miss. (Oct. 25, 2010) Navy SEALs conduct immediate action drills at the John C. Stennis Space Center. The drills are a part of the SEALs pre-deployment training. Navy SEALs are the maritime component of U.S. Special Operations Command and are trained to conduct a variety of operations from the sea, air and land.(U.S Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class John Scorza/Released)

CORONADO, Calif. (April 20, 2011) Students from Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/s) Class 287 participate in night gear exchange during the second phase of training at Naval Amphibious Base Coronado. During this evolution, two students will enter the water and exchange dive gear with masks that have been completely blackened. The Navy SEALs are the maritime component of U.S. Special Operations Forces and are trained to conduct a variety of operations from the sea, air and land. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kyle D. Gahlau/Released)

TOMS RIVER, N.J. (Sept. 30, 2010) Navy SEALs from all over the country took turns pounding the Tridents taken from their uniforms into the casket of Special Warfare Operator (SEAL) 3rd Class Denis Miranda during his funeral. One Special Forces operator placed his Special Forces patch on the casket. Miranda was one of nine service members killed when the helicopter in which they were traveling crashed in Zabul Province in Southern Afghanistan Sept. 21. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class John Scorza/Released)

MOYOCK, N.C. (Nov. 4, 2010) Navy SEALs conduct close quarters combat training in a simulated home at U.S. Training Center Moyock. SEALs are the maritime component of U.S. Special Operations Forces and are trained to conduct a variety of operations from the sea, air, and land. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eddie Harrison/Released)

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (Sept. 15, 2010) Special warfare combatant-craft crewmen (SWCC) assigned to Special Boat Team (SBT) 20 pilot an 11-meter rigid-hull inflatable boat (RHIB) to recover a RHIB and jumpers during a maritime craft aerial deployment system (MCADS) exercise. SWCC operators and parachute riggers from SBT-20 deploy an 11-meter RHIB at 3,500 feet from the rear of a C-130 aircraft during and MCADS drop. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joseph M. Clark/Released)

[Images courtesy of the Official Website of the US Navy.]