HMS Hunter, Sunk During First Battle of Narvik 10 April 1940, Found in One Thousand Feet of Water – Part 29

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British and Norwegian naval vessels went in formation around HMS Hunter.

From Metro UK News 9 March 2008:

A procession of ships led by Flag Ship HMS Albion, and including HMS Bulwark and HMS Cornwall held a formal wreath-laying and memorial service, conducting synchronised ceremonies on deck.

They then turned in formation and steamed over the wreck. The 110 crew who perished when HMS Hunter was sunk were toasted in the traditional Navy way, with a tot of rum poured over the side.

Two of the youngest members of the ship’s company on HMS Albion, Engineering Technician Joe George and Able Seaman Warfare Specialist Yasmin Thornton, both 17, dropped the wreath over the side on behalf of the ship’s company.

[Source: Metro UK News. Image courtesy of the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation.]

HMS Hunter, Sunk During First Battle of Narvik 10 April 1940, Found in One Thousand Feet of Water – Part 28

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Official Commemoration of Locating the wreck of HMS Hunter

Wreaths to be added over the
resting place of HMS Hunter.
British naval vessels participating in
the commemoration of Ofotfjorden.

According to NRK news network in Norway, over one thousand soldiers and sailors from Great Britain and Norway took part in the memorial service honoring the gallant Royal Navy officers and ratings who perished aboard HMS Hunter on 10 April 1940.

The First and Second Battles of Narvik were but the beginning of a long series of naval battles fought by the Royal Navy against the Germans and Italians. It was a very close run thing but in the end the Royal Navy prevailed. We owe them a lot.

The British Navy was honored Saturday the 95 soldiers who disappeared into the depths of HMS Hunter in April 1940.

[Source: Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation. Images courtesy of the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation, Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation, and the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation.]

HMS Hunter, Sunk During First Battle of Narvik 10 April 1940, Found in One Thousand Feet of Water – Part 27

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British Royal Navy helicopter over the resting place of HMS Hunter.

When Germany attacked Norway on 9 April 1940, only Great Britain and France came to her assistance. (A unit composed of Polish émigrés and refugees fought under British command.)

Soldiers of the Polish Independent Highlander Brigade during the Battle of Narvik in 1940.

Units of the French Foreign Legion fought in Norway along with French alpine troops. Unfortunately, the entire effort was disorganized and ineffective. The Norwegian Army itself was not even mobilized until after the Germans landed and when it was finally mobilized, it was one muddle after another since many of their key supply depots had already fallen into German hands.

Fortunately, almost every time the Germans were about to trap an Allied unit, that unit fought its way to the shoreline and was snatched from the Germans by the Royal Navy — often in the most perilous of circumstances with Royal Navy ships engaging land based German artillery.

The Norwegians have never forgotten the help they received from the British and the French. Eventually there was little the Allies could do in the face of overwhelming German air superiority and all Allied troops were withdrawn. The King of Norway and the Royal Family were taken off in a British destroyer and brought to England to form the Norwegian Government in exile. One good thing about a monarchy is that if you have the King or the Queen, only they can give legitimacy to a government.

Memorial speech in honor of the British officers and ratings killed in action aboard HMS Hunter.

[Images courtesy of the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation, Wikipedia, and the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation.]

HMS Hunter, Sunk During First Battle of Narvik 10 April 1940, Found in One Thousand Feet of Water – Part 26

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Official Commemoration of Locating the wreck of HMS Hunter

 

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Photo of what appears to be the seal of HMS Hunter on the bottom of the fjord.

 

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Vice Admiral Jan Reksten in January along with British Major General Garry Robison.

 

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Young sailors from HMS Albion were given the honor of laying a wreath at the site of HMS Hunter.

These young men and women are heirs to a tradition of excellence and bravery which goes back four hundred years. Yet under Conservative Party Prime Minister David Cameron, the Royal Navy has been reduced to nothing more than a glorified remnant of its former self — a shining collection of small toys to be brought out for ceremonial duties. It’s pathetic.

According to the British Ministry of Defense, there are only 28,000 officers and ratings in the Royal Navy. That is less than the number of sworn officers in the London Metropolitan Police. The US Coast Guard is almost twice as large.

[Sources: UK Defense Website and Wikipedia. Images courtesy of the BBC, the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation, and the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation.]