Air Attack Königsberg Capsizes After Pounding by Norwegians & RAF

 

Reichsmarine/ Kriegsmarine light cruiser Konigsberg

Konigsberg Visiting Gdynia, Poland, circa 1935. Note the offset arrangement of her after 15cm triple gun turrets. (US Navy History and Heritage Command).

 

The Königsberg on fire and sinking.

[Images courtesy of the US Navy History and Heritage Command]

9 April 1940, during the German invasion of Norway, Norwegian coastal artillery located on the approaches to Bergen fired effectively on Konigsberg and caused major damage to the ship which almost sank. On 10 April 1940, Royal Navy dive bombers of the Fleet Air Arm sank the ship.

 

Artwork by Adolf Bock, 1941, published in a book on the German Navy published by Erich Klinghammer, Berlin, during World War II. It depicts the light cruisers Köln and Königsberg landing troops at Bergen, Norway, on 9 April 1940. (USNA)

 

German damage control crews labored through the night, but the damage from the guns of the Norwegian fort had been grievous. Nonetheless, the ship was afloat–but not for long.

Approximately 0700 on 10 April 1940, sixteen Skua dive bombers of the Royal Navy’s Fleet Air Arm located Konigsberg in Bergen Harbor. German AA crews were exhausted and thought the British planes were German. The first British bomb hit knocked out electric power to the AA guns. Thus, before the Germans were fully alert a half dozen or more 500-pound armour piercing bombs had hit the Konigsberg.

With fires spreading out of control and water pouring into the ship from holes opened in the sides, the Kommandant ordered the crew to abandon ship, and the Konigsberg rolled over and sank. This was the first sinking of a major warship by aerial attack to occur. Many more would come. (Source: The German Invasion of Norway April 1940 by Geirr H Haarr)

 

While the British and French had long been urged by then First Lord of the Admiralty Winston Churchill to block Swedish iron ore shipments to Nazi Germany through Norwegian territorial waters, hand-wringing on behalf of the French and the British delayed this action. (The French Minister of War refused to speak to the Prime Minister who would avoid being in the same room with him if possible. Their respective mistresses also hated each other. This ill feeling caused delays in decision making as you might imagine).

 

+Halftone reproduction of a photograph taken while the ship was transiting the Kiel Canal, about 1935.
 

 

Moored in a German harbor, circa 1936. Note the ship’s crest on her bow, and what appear to be old torpedo boats tied up in the right distance.

 

When British ships were finally ordered out to lay mines in the sea lanes used to transport the ore and to capture the ice free port of Narvik, they ran into German forces who were staging a surprise invasion of Norway including the occupation of Narvik. Germans got to Narvik before the British by taking incredible chances in terrible sea conditions and managing to find the fjord which led to Narvik. Ten German destroyers carrying troops navigated in pitch dark down the Narvik fjord and put the troops ashore.

Captain Warburton-Lee, RN, VC.
Early that morning, while the exhausted German sailors were sleeping and their guard-ship not very alert, British destroyers under the Command of Captain B.A.W. Washburton-Lee, VC, skipped in and sank three destroyers and damaged more.
Their commander was killed in the action and posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross, the highest award for valour in Great Britain. Several days later the battleship HMS Warspite went down the fjord with numerous destroyers protecting her and her big guns hit the remaining German destroyers and blew them out of the water.

King Haakon VII and Crown Prince Olav seeking shelter on the outskirts of Molde during a German bombing raid on the city in April 1940.
While the invasion of Norway by the Germans was success, they failed in to accomplish one of their key objectives which was capturing the King. The Germans were looking everywhere for the King and Crown Prince (the Queen had died in 1938) and had been bombing any town or village they were rumored to be in.
On 1 May 1940, a British cruiser took them and leaders of Parliament from the small coastal town of Molde to a temporary capitol in  Tromsø.  King Haakon VII and the crown prince took refuge in a small cabin in the nearby woods.By the end of May, the Germans had attacked France and both France and Great Britain began to withdraw their forces. On 7 June 1940, the Royal Family and government ministers boarded HMS Devonshire and were spirited away to England. The King had been a Danish Prince elected King of Norway. He was an uncle to England’s King George VI.
Königsberg on her visit to Britain in 1934; she is flying the British White Ensign and firing a salute. (US Navy History and Heritage Command)
 

+Vertical aerial photograph, probably taken while the ship was under attack by British aircraft at Bergen, Norway, on 9 April 1940. Note the prominent swastika identification markings on her deck, fore, and aft. This was used in most German Navy ships to prevent them from being attacked by their own airforce.
Being attacked by your own planes was a constant problem particularly in the European theater. Pilots saw what they wanted to see. No matter what recognition devices ships employed their own planes attacked them.

Crowding Disaster Kills Thousands of French at Agincourt

Above is YouTube vid of Kenneth Branagh’s magnificent, spine-tingling giving the famous “we few, we happy few, we band of brothers….” speech to his men just before the battle.  Branagh, a brilliant actor played Henry V (King Harry to his men) and directed the film as well.
Henry-V-Branagh (1)
Kenneth Branagh as Henry V learns the French have withdrawn from the battlefield leaving him the victor. The King led his army in person.
Long before the countries of Europe existed more or less as we know them, huge parts of Europe and places around the world belong to various ruling dynasties. Through inheritance. marriage and clever dynastic moves, the Kings of England had come to rule a good portion of what today is modern France including the area of Normandy. In fact, Henry V controlled so much of France after the Battle of Agincourt that he became Regent of that country.
To maintain their rule the parts of France which belonged to the Royal House of the Plantagenets, the English had to keep fighting in France to maintain their rule.  The English victory over the French at the Battle of Agincourt on 25 October 1415 — Saint Crispin’s day is one of the great battles of history.

English long bowman at the ready

Personally led by King Henry V himself, the English beat the hell out of the French, largely due to the bravery of the English long bowmen and the incredible force of their arrows which could actually penetrate the armored suits of the French knights. At least that is the theory. No one is certain. Henry V, known as King Harry, led his noble men at arms in their suits of armor and formed them in a line four deep.
Kenneth Branagh as Henry V on the White Cliffs of Dover
The English archers were positioned on the flanks. King Henry’s deployment forced the French, who outnumbered the English by more than 5 to 1, to attack on a very narrow front of 750 yards. This had the effect of packing them together very tightly so they could hardly move and thus the French became jammed together.
English long bowman

The English long bowmen fired barrage after barrage of arrows high into the air over the mass of Frenchmen. Arrows fired high came down with tremendous force, each arrow having a sharpened iron arrowhead known as a bodkin point.

 

Bodkin1A bodkin point arrowhead. The iron part is about 4 ½ inches long.

 

Naturally, there is great historical debate over what happened at Agincourt. Experiments have been conducted which prove, or disprove, that the English arrows could penetrate French armor although the ones I have seen on YouTube and elsewhere don’t seem to account for the parabolic effect of the flight of the arrow and the additional force that would give the arrow as it fell.

While the arrows may, or may not have, been able to penetrate the steel armor of the richest nobles, they could penetrate chain mail. (Foot soldiers and lower ranking nobles on foot rarely wore more body protection than chain mail). Further, and more disruptive, the lack of protection horses had from the rain of English arrows was a “game changer.”

An armored knight on a steed was a powerful “weapons system” but unhorsed, he couldn’t move very quickly. In fact, without help, he couldn’t get back on his feet. Killing or disabling a mounted knight’s horse with a flight of arrows would hardly have been difficult.

Without his horse, a medieval knight wearing the battle armor of a mounted man, and not the lighter armor of a man expecting to fight on foot, would have been easy to neutralize since once unhorsed, his mobility was almost zero. Given the visor which covered his eyes except for a tiny slight, he would have difficulty seeing anything not directly in front of him.

An interesting theory claims that numbers of French men-at-arms who were attacking on foot were apparently killed in a classic crowd disaster. There were rank after rank of these men. When crowds press forward into a small space, the force generated begins to create a huge jam of people with more and more force being exerted by people in the back continuing to push forward. This asphyxiates those jammed into the small space who get pushed together so tightly they cannot move — or breathe. The force is also enough to break bones.

If this indeed happened to the thousands of Frenchmen on foot then while they were being jammed together so tightly they could not breath, and their armor plate was no doubt breaking the bones and spines of the men in front of them, it might explain why literally thousands and thousands of Frenchmen died.

 

Arrows fired by English longbow men could easily penetrate chain mail

According to a research paper by John J. Fruin, Ph.D., P.E.  The Causes and Prevention of Crowd Disasters:      

Crowd forces can reach levels that are almost impossible to resist or control. Virtually all crowd deaths are due to compressive asphyxia and not the “trampling” reported by the news media. Evidence of bent steel railings after several fatal crowd incidents show that forces of more than 4500 N (1,000 lbs.) occurred. Forces are due to pushing and the domino effect of people leaning against each other.
AGINCOURT  WAS PROBABLY ONE OF THE WORST CROWD CRUSH INCIDENTS IN THE WESTERN WORLD

When the Frenchmen began to endure this horror, panic would have set in, which would only have increased the intense force pushing the men together as some tried to go forward and others backward. Into the midst of this panicked crowd, the English bowmen were shooting upwards of 50,000 arrows a minute. They didn’t aim at individuals. They just fired masses of arrows into the air so they would come down in an arc onto a crowd.

figure above is from Medieval Character Models. (Arrows would have gone through the chain-mail)

http://henning-kleist.de/knights_en.html

There were 5,000 plus English archers and they could fire about ten arrows a minute. They were well trained although physical exhaustion would have led to a slackening of fire after a time. If you have ever fired a bow and arrow for just a few times you become aware of the muscle power required.

Still, whatever the pack of French knights and men at arms were trying to do, they were doing it under a hail of deadly arrows. And only the wealthiest men could afford the best steel armor which could not be penetrated by English arrows. Only a handful would have been wearing armor like that. Most would have had inferior armor and chain mail which the English arrows could and did penetrate.

French casualties were said to be in the thousands against a handful of English dead and the French who survived their calamitous defeat left the battlefield in shock defeated in mind and spirit.

From Henry V. After the slaughter of the French knights and gentlemen on foot, the French herald comes and informs Henry that he has won a great victory.

KING HENRY V

I tell thee truly, herald,
I know not if the day be ours or no;
For yet a many of your horsemen peer
And gallop o’er the field.

MONTJOY

The day is yours.

KING HENRY V

Praised be God, and not our strength, for it!
What is this castle call’d that stands hard by?

MONTJOY

They call it Agincourt.

KING HENRY V

Then call we this the field of Agincourt,
Fought on the day of Crispin Crispianus.

 

 

License Plates and Vehicle Identification Marks of the Wehrmacht

License Plates and Vehicle Identification Marks of the Wehrmacht

by

Charles McCain

copyright (c) 2017

author of An Honorable German published in hardback 2009 by GCP/Hachette & paperback 2010. Available on Kindle and Nook.

http://charlesmccain.com/an-honorable-german/

 

the first two letters on the number plate identify this as a Luftwaffe truck. This is a Mercedes “type LG3000”. This guy was probably stuck in Russia which isn’t a place you wanted to be stuck. Note the relatively narrow tires.

WL is the abbreviation of Wehrmacht Luftwaffe (that is W=Wehrmacht [which translates as ‘Defense Forces’ or ‘Armed Forces’] L=Luftwaffe –Air Force)

It may seem odd that German military vehicles – not tanks but other vehicles – had license plates or number plates as the Brits call them. But they did. One sees them in lots of photographs of German vehicles although as the war goes on one notices the plates are either missing or have been painted over or smeared with oil since the back color of the plates was white and stood out.

Tank 411 fires its flamethrower

The markings on tanks were normally a large three digit number painted on each side of their turret and often on the back of the turret. This was their radio call sign so their squadron commander could identify and direct specific tanks under his command to do specific things instead of just saying over his radio, “hey you, the tank under the tree…”

Tiger tank in Russia identified as Number 323 (German National Archive)

Soviet tanks did not have radios so once a battle started they could not be controlled by a superior officer which is why they normally attacked in waves. This was a major issue for their tank forces. At the same time, I should point out that radios in American and British tanks often didn’t work because of battery problems or having their antennas ripped off or having wires come loose after repeated firings of the main battery.

 

Sd.Kfz.250 German Army halftrack. The first two letters of the number plate identify this as an army vehicle. (W=Wehrmacht H=Heer (Army)

German military police constantly set up checkpoints and the number plate was one of the key issues they checked. Did the number plate correspond to the registration which was required to be carried in every vehicle? To drive a German Army vehicle, you had to have a license to drive that specific type of vehicle. That is, you had to have a license to drive a passenger car, a license to drive various classes or trucks, etc.

One can imagine the Feldgendarmarie knocking on one’s vehicle window and demanding, “license and registration.”

German Navy truck. You can see the first two letters on the number plate are WM. (W=Wehrmacht  M=Marine (navy)

On German vehicles, the number plates were coded in the following way: WH (Wehrmacht, Heer (army)), WL (Wehrmacht, Luftwaffe), WM (Wehrmacht, Marine (navy)), or SS. Each license plate began with one set of these letters. These two letter combinations were followed by five to six numerals, usually divided into a group of two numerals followed by a group of three or four numerals.

The first two numerals indicated which command the vehicle belonged to such as Army District, 10th U-Boot Flotilla, etc. and specifically what type of vehicle it was. The last three or four numerals comprised the actual code letters of the vehicle.

Each type of vehicle would have its own code. So each type of truck made by Mercedes or Ford would have had a different designation. Ford’s German subsidiary, as well as GM’s Opel subsidiary, continued to manufacture trucks for the German Army all through the war. German units tended to prefer Fords over Mercedes because the Fords were more durable and and easier to maintain.

WH on the license plate identifies this as a German Army truck. This happens to be a Ford. Ford-Werke in the Third Reich manufactured trucks for the German Armed forces. This continues to be a subject of great controversy as you might imagine. Henry Ford himself was a notorious anti-Semite.

 

This is a restored German Army Ford truck. You will note the ‘WH’ on the left front fender. The marking above the number plate indicates this truck belongs a specific company. The number of the company is hidden by the headlamp. On the right front fender is the divisional symbol of the Großdeutschland division. (This photo appears on so many websites that I was unable to determine who I should credit)

So a license plate on a German Armed Forces truck which began WH, belonged to the Army. The next two numerals would indicate what specific model of truck and to which type of unit such as a panzer or infantry division or Armee Korps it belonged to and the last three numerals would indicate which specific truck of a specific model it was. It was a bit more complex than this but this will give you a sense of what the number plates mean.

Note the numeral ‘3’ as the first numeral on the license plate of both trucks pictured above. Since these are both the same model of Ford truck they have the same letter designation.

 

A Luftwaffe (WL) Ford V3000 truck in Italy, 1943. photo courtesy of German National Archive.

Each type of vehicle would have its own code. So each type of truck made by Mercedes or Ford would have had a different designation. Ford’s German subsidiary continued to manufacture trucks for the German Army all through the war. German units tended to prefer Fords over Mercedes because the Fords were more durable and and easier to maintain.

 

In this photograph you can clearly see the silhouette of the German Army helmet used to mark vehicles of the Großdeutschland division. The mark below that indicates this vehicle is assigned to a reconnaissance unit.

All German Army divisions had a distinctive symbol which they put on signs, equipment, vehicles, etc. Example: the elite Großdeutschland (Greater Germany) division had as its symbol a white silhouette of a German Army helmet (1935 pattern). A tank or other vehicle of GD (as it was abbreviated) would also have had a tactical symbol indicating which type of unit the vehicle belonged to: infantry, armor, medical, engineers, etc.

Additionally, vehicles were marked with the insignia of the division and/or higher formation or ad hoc formation they were assigned to. Example: vehicles assigned to the 4 Armee during the invasion of France in 1940, had a ‘K’ on their vehicles which stood for ‘Kluge’. Günther von Kluge commanded 4 Armee during the attack on France.

 

You can see the Balkenkreuz clearly on this German dive bomber Ju 87 Stuka. The Luftwaffe was the first of the German Armed Forces to use the symbol.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balkenkreuz

 

German Luftwaffe Tornado attack jet with post-war design of the Balkenkreuz

Every German military vehicle, tank, or plane was also, then and now, marked with a version of the Balkenkreuz, which is said to be the symbol of the Teutonic Knights, a Germanic Catholic military/religious Order which conquered and ruled parts of Prussia and Eastern Europe in medieval times.

Sources: Wehrmacht Camouflage and Markings 1939-1945 by W.J.K. Davies and Wehrmacht Divisional Signs 1938-1945 by Theodor Hartmann. If you have a deep interest in this subject I would purchase one or both of these books. A lot of information on the internet is wrong.

Information on the Teutonic Knights can be found here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teutonic_Order

 

 

 

 

Charles McCain

copyright (c) 2017

author of An Honorable German available from any online bookstore as well as Kindle and Nook.

http://charlesmccain.com/an-honorable-german/

 

German Light Cruiser Köln

Reichsmarine Light Cruiser Köln

Reichsmarine sailors pose in front of a turret on light-cruiser Köln during a visit to Sydney, Australia.

 

Köln was the third of the three ‘K’ class light cruisers built for the Reichsmarine.

 

STARBOARD SIDE VIEW OF GERMAN LIGHT CRUISER KOLN WHICH VISITED MELBOURNE BETWEEN 1933-04-10 AND 1933-04-19. NOTE THE TALL TUBULAR MAST AND THE CONCENTRATION OF HER TRIPLE DRH LC/25 TURRETS WITH THEIR 15 CM SKC/25 GUNS AFT. SHE IS PAINTED IN THE STANDARD GERMAN SCHEME OF THE PERIOD WITH A MEDIUM GREY HULL AND LIGHT GREY FUNNELS. (NAVAL HISTORICAL COLLECTION).

The K class light cruisers suffered from many design problems since they were designed and built in the late 1920’s and had to adhere to the strict limit’s imposed on Germany by the Treaty of Versailles. As the design problems became increasingly apparent, the duties of the ships were limited to compensate and they increasingly failed to serve in the roles they were supposed to perform in the fleet.

The Köln patrolled the coasts of Spain and Portugal during the Spanish Civil War in 1937 and then spent the remainder of her life in the Baltic and North Sea. She participated in the Invasion of Norway and then she resumed mining operations and limited attacks on Allied Convoy shipping. In February 1943, the Köln was damaged in a submarine attack and remained out of service until March 1944 receiving repairs.

Light cruiser Koln in Baltic Stripe camouflage

 

She recommissioned as a training ship for cadets. On 12 December 1944, she was heavily damaged by a British bombing raid. She was transferred to Wilhelmshaven in February 1945 to begin extensive repairs. Once there, she was sunk on even keel during another British bombing raid on 3 March 1945. Her turrets remained above water and continued to shell the oncoming Allied advance.

The Köln was captured on 5 May 1945 by the Polish First Armored Division along with 200 other ships of the Kriegsmarine in the surrender of the Wilhelmshaven garrison. She was finally scrapped in 1946. Collected below are photographs of Köln during World War Two.

+
“Conquest of Bergen by German Light Cruisers”
Artwork by Adolf Bock, 1941, published in a book on the German Navy published by Erich Klinghammer, Berlin, during World War II. It depicts the light cruisers Köln and Königsberg landing troops at Bergen, Norway, on 9 April 1940.

 

+
Köln (German Light Cruiser, 1930-1945).
Reconnaissance photograph, probably taken by the British Royal Air Force, showing the ship (marked by arrow) moored to the shore in the Fætten Fjord, about 30 KM ENE of Trondheim, Norway, 19 July 1942. Note rafts and netting used to camouflage the ship, and anti-torpedo booms moored to protect her from attacks from abeam and astern. Booms abeam have been folded to simulate a ship.

 

+
Köln (German Light Cruiser, 1930-1945).
Reconnaissance photograph, probably taken by the British Royal Air Force, showing the ship (marked by arrow) moored to the shore in the Fætten Fjord, about 30 KM ENE of Trondheim, Norway, 19 July 1942. The southern side of the Fjord is in the top center of the image.

 

+
Köln (German Light Cruiser, 1930-1945).
Reconnaissance photograph, probably taken by the British Royal Air Force, showing the ship (marked by arrow) moored to the shore in the Fætten Fjord, about 30 KM ENE of Trondheim, Norway, 19 July 1942. Note rafts and netting used to camouflage the ship, and anti-torpedo booms moored to protect her from attacks from abeam and astern. Booms abeam have been folded to simulate a ship. The southern side of the Fjord is just beyond the top of the image.

 

+
German cruiser Köln sunk by Allied bombing on 7 May 1945 in Wilhelmshaven, Germany.

[Images courtesy of Wikimedia and the Department of the Navy – Naval History & Heritage Command.]

Which Requires the Most Extensive Training? A Dog Walker, a Manicurist, or a Personal Trust Trustee?

 

This is an article I ghosted for with my colleague, Daniel Smith, who knows this stuff backwards and forwards.

Which Requires the Most Extensive Training? A Dog Walker, a Manicurist, or a Personal Trust Trustee?

by Daniel Smith

 

 

Obviously, the requirements to be a dog walker are simple. All you need is the ability to walk and an affinity for dogs, right? Actually, you probably need a business license and since you are going in and out of people’s homes, you will probably want to be bonded. Most brand name dog walking businesses are.

Liability insurance is also important. If you are walking a dog on a long leash and the dog inexplicably bites someone you want to be protected if you are sued. There are many other issues. In fact, the Dog Walking Agreement and Guide from LegalZoom is eight pages long and doesn’t include the legal agreement. *

What about a certification? Not required but it looks good on your list of qualifications. If you want to be a certified dog professional, you can take a four-day course leading to this certification at different locations around the country. The cost is $850.00.**

OK. That seems a bit extensive just to walk dogs. What about being a manicurist? All one must know is how to give a manicure. Right? Not exactly. To work in a high-level beauty salon as a nail technician, that is, a manicurist, you will need to pass the written Nail Technician Licensing Examination, given by the National-Interstate Council of State Boards of Cosmetology (NIC). ***  Before you laugh, let me say I read some of the sample questions and concluded there are valid reasons one of the most popular study guides is 128 pages long and costs $50.97 plus shipping.

What about the qualifications to serve as the trustee or a personal trust and/or executor of someone’s estate? This can be an onerous task requiring extensive knowledge of trusts and estates. Presumably to serve in this position one must have some legal and financial training, have passed a certification exam, and register with the state. Therefore, serving as a trustee must require substantially more training than being a dog walker or manicurist.

Unfortunately, this is not the case. What qualifications must an individual possess to be a trustee? The willingness to act. That’s all. The person doesn’t have to take a licensing exam to act as a trustee or executor because there isn’t one.  Background check? No. Knowledge of legal and financial issues a trustee will be confronted with? No. Registration with the state? No. A minimum standard of education? No. You don’t even need to be literate as we shall see.

Anyone can serve as trustee of a personal trust and/or executor of an estate and anyone has. A year prior to her death in 1993, tobacco heiress Doris Duke named her butler, Bernard Lafferty, as co-executor of her 1.2-billion-dollar estate and as one of a small number of trustees of her charitable trust. An article which appeared in the New York Times on 11 April 1996, alleged that Mr. Lafferty (who died in November of 1996) was “an admitted alcoholic and barely literate.” In addition, that same article alleged that Mr. Lafferty “moved into her (Doris Duke’s) mansions and traveled around in her chauffeured Cadillac and her private Boeing 737 at estate expense.”

Did lawsuits come riding? Yes, like a brigade of cavalry. According to the same article in the New York Times, dozens of accusations were made against Mr. Lafferty including several of a most scandalous nature. Legal wrangling between interested parties went on for thirty months and eventually involved more than forty lawyers from ten different firms.  At the end of that time, all parties reached a settlement approved by the court.

Mr. Lafferty received a handsome settlement from the estate and in return, he resigned his posts as co-executor of Ms. Duke’s estate and as a trustee of the Doris Duke Charitable Trust. While Mr. Lafferty may have acted poorly, all allegations against him were withdrawn. Did he do something illegal? Impossible to say since none of the allegations were followed up.

I think we would all agree that Ms. Duke should have given more thought about whom she chose to carry out the duties of settling her estate. Yet over the years, I have seen people spending more time researching the options and prices of a new car they want to buy than selecting a trustee for their personal trusts. This is where you as an FA must step in and acquaint your client with the damage an incompetent trustee can do.

You further need to impress upon your client that the person they choose to succeed them as trustee must know what they are doing. Selecting the right person to supervise and distribute your wealth for the benefit of your loved ones is far, far more important than saving $500 on a new Mercedes.

If your client selects an individual as trustee they need to vet this person as thoroughly as possible and be guided by the principle of caveat emptor— let the buyer beware.

To learn more about this topic, register for our Cannon Trust I curriculum.

Copyright ©2017 Cannon Financial Institute – All Rights Reserved

Subscribe to Cannon Insights at http://www.cannonfinancial.com/newsletter/subscribe

Resources:

*  https://www.legalzoom.com/download/pdf/dog-walking-agreement.pdf
**  http://dogtec.org/dogwalkingacademy.php
***  https://nictesting.org/

Contributing Writer: Subject Matter Expert Charles McCain

COMMENT FROM CHARLES McCAIN: Cannon Financial Institute is the “gold standard” for wealth management training, development, and consulting. I worked at the firm for many years and my colleagues were the most talented people I have ever worked with.

I started writing articles directed to Financial Advisors for Cannon in January of  2016. After a hiatus of nine years, I am pleased to report that my colleagues continue to be the most talented people I have ever worked with and it is a pleasure to be working with them again.  I usually post these articles on my blog a week or two after Cannon posts them on their site. Cannon’s main website is here:

https://www.cannonfinancial.com

The article is here: www.cannonfinancial.com/ dogwalker manicurist or trustee

Three Wars Shot in Face, Head, Stomach, Ankle, Leg, Hip, and Ear Sir Carton de Wiart

CECIL BEATON PHOTOGRAPHS: POLITICAL AND MILITARY PERSONALITIES (IB 3449C) Political Personalities: Half length portrait of Lieutenant General Adrian Carton de Wiart VC, Mr Churchill’s special representative in Chungking. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205125075

 

The most decorated man in the British Army in the 20th Century or certainly close to it. Given the various medals handed out during wars, it is difficult to say who is the most decorated. But Lieutenant General Carton de Wiart is certainly in the top five most decorated soldiers of the British Army.

 

World War One. Carton de Wiart, center. Photo courtesy of London Daily Mail

 

http://wdailymail says de Wiart bio best-Wikipedia-entry-VC-winning-officer-shot-face-head-stomach-ankle-leg-hip-ear.html

Says Wikipedia: “He served in the Boer War, First World War, and Second World War; was shot in the face, head, stomach, ankle, leg, hip, and ear; survived two plane crashes; tunnelled out of a prisoner-of-war camp; and tore off his own fingers when a doctor refused to amputate them. Describing his experiences in the First World War, he wrote, “Frankly I had enjoyed the war.”

wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrian Carton de Wiart

 

In great britain, when something official is done it is said to have been “gazetted” since it appears in the official London Gazette. Carton’s Victoria cross was “gazetted’ ON 9 September 1916.
For the award of the Victoria Cross, La Boiselle, France, 2 – 3 July 1916, Captain ( T / Lieutenant Colonel ) Adrian Carton de Wiart, DSO, 4th Dragoon Guards, command 8th Bn, Gloucestershire Regiment.

For most conspicuous bravery, coolness and determination during severe operations of a prolonged nature. ( La Boiselle, France ).

It was owing in a great measure to his dauntless courage and inspiring example that a serious reverse was averted. He displayed the utmost energy and courage in forcing our attack home. After three other battalion Commanders had become casualties, he controlled their commands, and ensured that the ground won was maintained at all costs. He frequently exposed himself in the organisation of positions and of supplies, passing unflinchingly through fire barrage of the most intense nature.hIS GALLANTRY WAS INSPIRING TO ALL.

Adrian Carton de Wiart was invested with his Victoria Cross by King George V at Buckingham Palace on the 29th November 1916.

http://www.victoriacross.org.uk/bbwiart.htm

 

Lt. Gen. Carton de Wiart, oil on canvas, 1919. Courtesy National Portrait Gallery London.

THE BRITISH MILITARY MISSION TO POLAND, 1919-1921 (Q 92207) Major-General Adrian Carton de Wiart VC, the Chief of British Mission to Poland, on his charger. Photograph possibly taken in Lwów. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205335609

 

LIEUTENANT COLONEL ADRIAN CARTON DE WIART (Q 68300) Lieutenant Colonel Adrian Carton De Wiart VC KBE CB CMG DSO. Unit: 4th Dragoon Guards (Royal Irish), attached to 8th Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment as Commanding Officer. Death: 5 June 1963. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205022089

 

Lieutenant Colonel Carton de Wiart was awarded the Victoria Cross for the following action: “On 2 July – 3 July 1916, at La Boisselle, France, Lieutenant-Colonel Carton de Wiart’s dauntless courage and inspiration averted what could have been a serious reverse. He displayed the utmost energy in forcing the attack home and after three other battalion commanders had become casualties, he controlled their commands and made sure that the ground was held at all costs. In organising the positions to be held, he exposed himself fearlessly to enemy fire.” Carton de Wiart was born in Belgium.

He joined the British Army and fought during the Boer War of 1899-1902, sustaining a serious chest wound. On the outbreak of the First World War, Carton de Wiart was serving with the Somaliland Camel Corps and engaged in suppressing a rebellion by Mohammed bin Abdullah’s Muslim forces. In an attack upon an enemy fort at Shimber Berris, Carton de Wiart was shot in the face, losing his left eye. He served on the Western Front from 1915, commanding three infantry battalions and a brigade. He was also seriously wounded seven times, losing his left hand in 1915.

Carton de Wiart spent the interwar years in Poland, serving with the British Military Mission between 1919 and 1921 and escaping the country as it was overrun by German and Soviet forces in 1939. He then served in Norway and was en route to take up a command in Yugoslavia when his aircraft was shot down. Carton de Wiart was taken prisoner by the Italians by whom he was released in 1943. He spent the remaining war years in the Far East, witnessing the Japanese surrender at Singapore. Carton de Wiart died in 1963.

www.iwm.org.uk/bio of carton de wiart

THE BRITISH ARMY IN NORWAY APRIL – JUNE 1940 (N 107) The Evacuation from Namsos 2-3 May 1940: British soldiers on the quay at Namsos awaiting evacuation. On the left is Major General Carton de Wiart. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205225966

Veteran Royal Navy Battleship Malaya at Sea World War Two

Battleships HMS Barham, HMS Malaya and aircraft carrier HMS Argus at sea circa 1935.  (US Navy Archive)

Both HMS Barham and HMS Malaya were Queen Elizabeth class battleships built during World War One. Neither received significant modification between the wars and were past their design life when World War Two came. They were both old and slow. HMS Barham was sunk in the Mediterranean while HMS Malaya spent much of the war escorting Allied troop convoys. Under specific instructions from the Admiralty, all troop convoys, many from America, had to be escorted by a battleship plus a heavy close escort force.

The Cunard liners, RMS Queen Elizabeth and RMS Queen Mary were exempt from this because of their speed. When accepted into service as troop transports, their designation was changed to HMT/S (His Majesty’s Transport ship)

HMS Malaya, in spite of not being reconstructed like several of her sisters including HMS Warspite, still performed yeoman service in the war. Her engines were not in great condition and she could not make more than 20 knots which limited her from staying with a battle fleet. In the Med, she often feel far behind HMS Warspite, flagship of C-in-C Mediterranean.

ON BOARD THE CRUISER HMS HERMIONE OPERATING WITH HMS MALAYA AND DESTROYERS OF FORCE H. 10 TO 13 FEBRUARY 1942, AT SEA IN THE ATLANTIC. (A 7493) HMS MALAYA at sea. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205141570

 

HMS MALAYA LEAVING NEW YORK HARBOUR AFTER REFITTING IN AMERICA UNDER FACILITIES AFFORDED BY THE US GOVERNMENT. (A 5435) Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205139658

After being hit by a German torpedo in March of 1941, HMS Malaya spent four months in dry dock in New York being repaired. She was scrapped in 1948 after long and honourable service.

ON BOARD HMS MALAYA. OCTOBER 1941. (A 5692) Seamen replacing the guard rails after a Fairey Swordfish sea plane had been catapulted from the deck of HMS MALAYA. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205139902

 

Fairy Swordfish torpedo bombers were rugged planes in spite of their fragile look. A handful of them were made as amphibious planes and used for shot spotting during battle or reconnaissance. Once landed in the water, the plane would position itself so that its home ship only had to slow down but not stop to when a tow rope was thrown to the crew. They attached this to a special fitting and a crane lifted them out of the water.

ON BOARD HMS MALAYA. OCTOBER 1941. (A 5693) After a reconnaissance flight the Fairey Swordfish sea plane returns to HMS MALAYA and is hoisted in board. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205139903

 

ON BOARD HMS MALAYA. OCTOBER 1941. (A 5691) A Fairey Swordfish sea plane catapulted from the deck of HMS MALAYA. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205139901

 

ON BOARD HMS MALAYA. OCTOBER 1941. (A 5695) Sunday morning Divisions on board HMS MALAYA. The Captain, Captain C Coppinger, DSC, RN, inspecting a division on the quarterdeck. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205139904