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Sweden Sold Arms Both Sides World War Two

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN NORTH-WEST EUROPE 1944-45 (B 13136) The crew of a Bofors anti-aircraft gun view vapour trails in the sky high above the Dutch-German border near Brunssum, 25 December 1944. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205202969

Famous Swedish Bofors 40 mm anti-aircraft gun used by all sides in World War Two. (Once war came countries which could not get them directly from Sweden manufactured them under license. The gun above is being manned by British troops).

THE BRITISH ARMY IN FRANCE 1939 (O 327) A 40mm Bofors anti-aircraft gun and crew near Douai, November 1939. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205017

 

Domestically produced British anti-aircraft manufactured from British designs lacked the effectiveness and versatility of the Bofors 40mm.

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN FRANCE 1939 (O 325) A 40mm Bofors anti-aircraft gun and crew near Douai, November 1939. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205015

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN FRANCE 1939 (O 326) A 40mm Bofors anti-aircraft gun and crew near Douai, November 1939. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205016

 

 

A group of Finnish soldiers operating a Bofors gun during the Continuation War, Suulajärvi

Says Wrong Thing Union Cannonball Takes Head

 

Artillerymen from Ft. Riley fire a replica of the 1855 model 3-inch cannon, 2012. (official US Army photo)

“Captain William McCaslan of Second Florida Infantry–Princeton class of 1854— led a gallant attack by Florida troops — after Pickett’s charge, during the Battle of Gettysburg. Having survived this exercise in futility, he rode back to Confederate lines with a fellow officer.

As he went, McCaslan spoke of battles yet to come — “and it seems impossible to pass in safety through them all,” he said glumly. At that moment a cannonball hit his head.”

Paragraphs above quoted from:

https://paw.princeton.edu/article/princeton-confederacys-service

More than two hundred Princeton graduates served in the Confederate Army although a complete list has never been compiled according to this article.

If you want a special souvenir, you can buy a Civil War cannonball for as little as $50.00 on Ebay.

 

British Army in Burma


THE BRITISH ARMY IN BURMA 1945 (SE 1824) Lord Louis Mountbatten, Supreme Allied Commander South East Asia, with Major General G N Wood in a jeep during a visit to the 25th Indian Division, January 1945. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205135

Frightfully unqualified for anything, Mountbatten made numerous ghastly mistakes. His appointment in South East Asia did increase morale of the “Forgotten Army of Burma” since he was a member of the royal family and enjoyed massive press coverage.  In fact, Mountbatten made the “forgotten army of Burma” quite famous. Very keen on publicity was Dickie Mountbatten. His HQ in Ceylon had a staff of 7,000 men and women a number of whom spent their time getting him publicity.

THE BRITISH ARMY IN BURMA 1945 (SE 2358) A 25-pdr field gun and its crew about to start their journey on a pontoon raft down the Kalapanzin River from Buthidaung, January 1945. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205199

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN BURMA 1945 (SE 2355) A 25-pdr field gun and jeep being transported on a pontoon raft down the Kalapanzin River from Buthidaung, January 1945. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205198

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN BURMA 1945 (SE 2188) Sherman tanks moving forward to support infantry in the Myebon area, January 1945. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205180

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN BURMA 1945 (SE 3167) A Daimler scout car, Sherman tank and Dodge weapons carrier disembarking from a pontoon raft after crossing the Irrawaddy at Ngazun, 28 February 1945. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205470

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN BURMA 1945 (SE 1931) Men of the 6th Gurkha Rifles go into action at Singu on the Irrawaddy bridgehead, with Sherman tanks in support, February 1945. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205147
THE BRITISH ARMY IN BURMA 1945 (SE 3111) The crew of a jeep take stand ready with Sten guns beside their vehicle during an encounter with the Japanese in the advance on Mandalay, February 1945. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205126435
THE BRITISH ARMY IN BURMA 1945 (SE 3342) The .50-inch machine gun of a Priest 105mm self-propelled gun, 7 March 1945. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205504

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN BURMA 1945 (SE 3335) The crew of ‘Deepcut’, a Priest 105mm self-propelled gun, have a cup of tea and play a hand of cards during a lull in fighting, 7 March 1945. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205503

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN BURMA 1945 (SE 3346) Priest 105mm self-propelled gun in action, 7 March 1945 Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205505

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN BURMA 1945 (SE 3361) Priest 105mm self-propelled gun, 7 March 1945. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205506

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN BURMA 1945 (SE 3074) Sherman tanks of Probyn’s Horse (5th King Edward VII’s Own Lancers), 255th Armoured Brigade, advancing on the road between Myaungyu on the Irrawaddy bridgehead and Meiktila, March 1945. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205451

British Indian Army, British Army and British Commonwealth Troops Reclaim Burma from Japanese

The largest all-volunteer fighting formation of the British Empire in World War Two was the British Indian Army which was recruited in British India then comprised of modern day Pakistan, India, and Bangladesh. More than 2.5 million men served in the British Indian Army and they fought all over the world.

 

 

ALLIED FORCES IN NORTHERN BURMA, JUNE 1945 (HU 87180) Mandalay fell to the 19 Indian Division after fierce fighting during the drive on Mandalay from the north. Picture shows: Tanks with infantry speeding along the road to attack a village near Madaya, 12 miles north of Mandalay. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205085629

 

THE WAR IN THE FAR EAST: THE BURMA CAMPAIGN 1941-1945 (HU 87182) Mule convoy carrying supplies into Burma. Photo shows: Mule convoy crossing a stream, the water is muddy and leech infested. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205088016
THE WAR IN THE FAR EAST: THE BURMA CAMPAIGN 1941-1945 (HU 88980) Imphal to Kohima: the meeting at MS 109 of the 7th Cavalry and 33 Corps. Jemader Karnail Singh of 7th Cavalry shakes hands with Major AC T Brotherton, a 33 Corps Staff Officer. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205219276

 

THE WAR IN THE FAR EAST: THE BURMA CAMPAIGN 1941-1945 (HU 88979) Wingates Expedition: Air Supply Dropping of Rations. View from an aircraft of a message written on the ground with parachutes. It reads ‘Plane land here now’. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205219283
BURMA VICTORY: 4TH CORPS CAPTURE MEIKTILA (IND 4447) Men of an Indian Regiment charge burning remnants of Seywa during the drive on Meiktila. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205225485

 

BURMA: BRITISH TROOPS CROSS SHWELI RIVER (SE 1790) After the heaviest air and land bombardment in this sector of the Burma front, British and Indian troops of the 36th Division forced a crossing in assault craft over the Shweli river to Myitson. The Shweli is the last river barried to the 36th Division’s advance into central Burma, and the Japanese opposed the ferry crossing fanatically. This image shows men of the Buffs (Royal East Kent Regiment)… Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205225496
THE WAR IN THE FAR EAST: THE BURMA CAMPAIGN 1941-1945 (HU 87183) Tanks of the 25th Dragoons near Fort White. 25-pounders re-established in the gunners box on Kennedy Peak open fire again on the retreating Japanese. Picture shows: General Lee tank on Hill 8225. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205088015
THE BRITISH ARMY IN BURMA 1945 (SE 4470) British troops in the Sittang Bend area, 1 August 1945. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205584

Defensive measures for Burma were never put into place by the British because they did not believe Burma was under much threat. By the time they did, it was too late. After a series of small engagements with invading Japanese, British Army, British Indian Army and Commonwealth troops under General Sir Harold Alexander (later Field Marshal, Earl Alexander of Tunis) made a fighting retreat to British India where the Japanese were halted. The climate made fighting even more miserable than fighting could be.

THE BRITISH ARMY IN BURMA 1945 (SE 4459) General Sir Claude Auchinleck, Commander-in-Chief India, inspecting troops, 1 August 1945. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205588

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN BURMA 1945 (SE 4463) 4.2-inch mortars of 33rd Anti-tank Regiment, Royal Artillery, in the Sittang Bend area, 1 August 1945. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205582

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN BURMA 1945 (SE 4468) 5.5-inch guns of 63rd Medium Battery firing on Satthinagyon, 1 August 1945. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205583

Battleship HMS Rodney at War

THE ROYAL NAVY DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR (A 1417) Royal Marines remove old paint from the X gun turret on board HMS RODNEY before repainting. Another of the triple 16 inch gun turrets can be seen beyond the men. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205185114

 

THE ROYAL NAVY DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR (A 1426) On board HMS RODNEY ‘Boys’ receiving instruction on how to ‘heave the lead’. The lead weighs 10 to 14 pounds and the picture shows a Boy standing in the ‘chains’ about to heave the lead. Going in and out of harbour a Leadman is always in the chains taking soundings which he calls out to the bridge. The Forth railway bridge can be seen in the distance. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205185116

 

MEN OF THE HMS RODNEY KEEP FIGHTING FIT. 20 JANUARY 1943, MERS-EL-KEBIR, ON BOARD HMS RODNEY. (A 14364) A game of deck hockey during the dog watches on board HMS RODNEY. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205147536

 

GUNNERS KEEP UP TO THE MARK ON BOARD THE BATTLESHIP RODNEY. MARCH 1943, ON BOARD HMS RODNEY. (A 15733) A gunnery spotting table rigged up on the forecastle on board HMS RODNEY. A model ship and model splashes are used to indicate to the gunnery control officer high up in the director control tower, the accuracy of his ‘fire’. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205149007

 

SENDING UP THE HEAVY SHELLS ON BOARD THE BATTLESHIP RODNEY. MARCH 1943, ON BOARD HMS RODNEY. (A 15737) In a 16′ shell ammunition room on board HMS RODNEY a sailor revolves a shell into the hoist while an empty shell container returns to position to fetch another shell from the tray. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205148757

 

MIDSHIPMEN TRAINING ON THE BATTLESHIP RODNEY. MARCH 1943, ON BOARD HMS RODNEY. (A 15736) Midshipmen being trained in rifle drill on the forecastle on board HMS RODNEY. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205148756

American Tradition of Being Knee Walking Drunk

5.8 Gallons of pure alcohol per year in 1790 now down a gallon

 

Gentlemen having a few beers in the early 1900s

Americans like to drink alcohol although we drink less than we used to. Primness, like sipping a glass of sherry,  seems to be in fashion these days as opposed to knocking back your liquor.

I would get drunk if I had to wear these clothes

I also note that “binge drinking” among college students is defined as five or more drinks in an evening. Five? When a student at Tulane in the 1970s we were just warming up after five drinks.

Serving out the rum ration aboard a Royal Navy ship circa 1920s. The wooden tub being used has the legend, “The King God Bless Him” because the grog ration (that is rum mixed with water) was a gift of the Crown to the men of the navy.  The bosun piped “up spirits” about 11:30 am. Usually one of the older ratings would shout, “stand fast the Holy Ghost.”

Each man is from a separate mess table which sat about ten men and is collecting the ration for the entire group of ten in the tin buckets the men are holding. Petty officers are regulating the amount served based on the calculations in the book the man in the foreground is looking at.

Men were registered in the spirits book as T for teetotaler, or not of age, or ration suspended because of punishment. Boys could join the Royal Navy at sixteen but were not permitted to be issued with grog until they were eighteen. They could, however, take advantage of the generous cigarette allowance they received from the navy, this also a gift of the monarch and the tobacco wasn’t taxed.

Having a pick me up glass of beer in the morning

According to the BBC, “Early Americans even took a healthful dram for breakfast, whiskey was a typical lunchtime tipple, ale accompanied supper and the day ended with a nightcap. Continuous imbibing clearly built up a tolerance as most Americans in 1790 consumed an average 5.8 gallons of pure alcohol a year.”

This is down to 3.4 gallons of pure alcohol as of 2010 says the World Health Organization. If you take women out of the equation, American males consume 4.7 gallons of pure alcohol so we’re down a gallon a year in the last 225 years.

I don’t think drinking a lot is a good idea and we drank too much in college but it was a different time and place. Still, it is interesting to note that our forebears in American were totally drunk all the time. You wonder how they got anything done or built all that antique furniture people pay so much for these days.

Canadian Built Lancasters Bomb Nazi Germany

Given its relatively small population, Canada made an immense contribution to Allied victory in WW Two. Canadian troops, most of whom were volunteers, fought all over Europe although mainly in the Italian campaign and the battles in Northwest Europe. The 3rd Canadian Infantry Divison comprised a part of the Allied forces on D-Day.

 

Lest We Forget
44,000 Canadian soldiers, sailors, and airmen lost their lives in World War Two.

 

British built R5727, the pattern Lancaster, in Gander 23 August 1942.

photo courtesy of Bomber Command Museum of Canada

“On September 18, 1941, a decision was made to build Lancasters in Canada and the first drawings arrived in January 1942. For a country still largely agrarian and just recovering from a decade of depression, the challenge was immense. 500,000 manufacturing operations were involved in building a Lancaster which was made up of some 55,000 separate parts even when engines and turrets were only considered as one and small items such as rivets, nuts, and bolts were not included. A Lancaster from England was flown across the Atlantic in August 1942 to act as a “pattern” and a Crown Corporation named Victory Aircraft was formed to do the work in Malton, Ontario.”

More than 130,000 Allied pilots trained in Canada which also “hosted” tens of thousands of German prisoners of war. Famed U-Boat ace Otto Kretschmer was held in a Canadian POW camp.

KB-882 is one of over 400 Mk-10 Lancasters built in Canada.

 

Workers at the Victory Aircraft Plant in Malton, Ontario
celebrating the rollout of KB799, the one-hundredth Canadian built Lancaster.

 

Lancaster R-5727 over Montreal 24 Aug. 1942

The first Canadian-built Avro Lancaster B Mark X, KB700 “The Ruhr Express”, taxying after landing at Northolt, Middlesex, following a delivery flight across the Atlantic. KB700 was the first of 300 aircraft built by Victory Aircraft of Malton, Ontario, and flew operationally with Nos. 405 and 419 Squadrons RCAF.
CH 11041
Part of
AIR MINISTRY SECOND WORLD WAR OFFICIAL COLLECTION
Royal Air Force official photographer
Crouch F W (F/O)

 

11 Jan 1945
Moose – Ghost Sqn
Snow’s snow and fun’s fun, but when snow hits the stations of the Canadian Bomber Group, it just means a lot of work for all personnel, air crew and ground crew types alike. Up a-top the starboard wing of a Canadian-built Lancaster on the station where the Moose and Ghost squadrons are based, four of the boys scrape off the stubborn snow. They are, left to right, LAC F.J. Chapioniere, a fitter from Champion, Alta.; LAC B. Holiday, Elgin, Ont.; LAC J.G. Chagnon, St. Hyacinthe, P.Q., and LAC W. Van Norman, Guleph, 90 Nottingham St., Ont.

 

ground crew of a Canadian Lancaster

 

Untitled, 4/23/04, 1:34 PM, 8C, 9590×6580 (1650+8275), 150%, A.I. Basic, 1/60 s, R83.9, G77.6, B95.0

Let’s Go Canada! by Henri Eveleigh 1939–1945

(Issued by the World War Two agency, Canadian Bureau of Public Information)