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ROYAL NAVY ADVANCED COASTAL FORCES BASE CORSICA

 

THE NAVY AT BASTIA. 1 JUNE 1944, ADVANCED COASTAL FORCES BASE, BASTIA, CORSICA (A 24231) Some of the men and the craft at the Bastia base. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205156154

 

THE NAVY AT BASTIA. 1 JUNE 1944, ADVANCED COASTAL FORCES BASE, BASTIA, CORSICA (A 24229) View of the advanced coastal forces base at Bastia. MGB’s in the foreground. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205156152

 

THE NAVY AT BASTIA. 1 JUNE 1944, ADVANCED COASTAL FORCES BASE, BASTIA, CORSICA (A 24230) View of the advanced coastal forces base at Bastia. MGB’s in the foreground. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205156153
THE ROYAL NAVY DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR (A 24228) View of the advanced coastal forces base at Bastia, Corsica with MGBs , including MGB 658, in the foreground. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205119869

 

THE ROYAL NAVY DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR (A 26456) MGB 646 on its way to Skiathos, Greece, with the escort carrier HMS STALKER in the background. After its liberation Skiathos was used as an advanced base for the assault on Salonika. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205119920

 

 

“We shall Fight in France…we shall never surrender…”

 

Winston Churchill to Parliament on 4 June 1940

“…we shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we shall defend our Island, whatever the cost may be…we shall never surrender.”

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN FRANCE 1940 (F 2038) Men of the 2nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers in a trench in front of the Maginot Line, 3 January 1940. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205204830

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN FRANCE 1940 (F 4121) Men of 2nd Battalion Essex Regiment study a map during an exercise at Meurchin, 27 April 1940. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205204923

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN FRANCE 1940 (F 4074) Gracie Fields shares a joke with troops in a village near Valenciennes, 26 April 1940. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205204920

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN FRANCE 1940 (F 4186) Searchlight of 10th Battery, 3rd Searchlight Regiment, Royal Artillery, near Carvin, 1 May 1940. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205204924

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN FRANCE 1940 (F 3238) Troops from 2nd Battalion Middlesex Regiment, 3rd Division, training on the Vickers machine gun at Gondecourt, 21 March 1940 Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205204892

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN FRANCE 1939 (O 46) Motor transport of 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards outside Battalion HQ at Conlie, 22 September 1939. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205204992

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN FRANCE 1939 (O 223) Men of 1st Battalion Queen’s Own Cameron Highlanders constructing trenches at Aix, 12 November 1939. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205011

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN FRANCE 1939 (O 514) Troops of the 1st Royal Berkshire Regiment, 2nd Division, checking the papers of civilians at Becun on the Franco-Belgian border, 10 October 1939. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205029

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN FRANCE 1939-40 (O 2288) The Grenadier Guards building breastworks on flooded ground at Hem, December 1939. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205065

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN FRANCE 1939 (O 86) Men of the BEF being transported from Cherbourg to their assembly area in a railway goods wagon, 29 September 1939. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205204998

On the top right you will note the loading limits of the goods wagon for military purposes:  40 men or 8 horses.

THE BRITISH ARMY IN FRANCE 1939 (O 415) Troops from the Royal Berkshire Regiment manning trenches near Mouchin, 29 November 1939. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205023

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN FRANCE 1939 (O 427) The cramped interior of the battery commander’s dugout at a 25-pdr field gun battery near Mouchin, 29 November 1939. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205025

 

THE BRITISH ARMY IN FRANCE 1939-40 (O 878) Lines of barbed-wire obstacles stretch across snow-covered fields near Menin, 17 Infantry Brigade sector, 21 January 1940. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205055
THE BRITISH ARMY IN FRANCE 1939 (O 327) A 40mm Bofors anti-aircraft gun and crew near Douai, November 1939. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205205017

 

*Featured image:  A 40mm Bofors anti-aircraft gun and crew near Douai, November 1939 Courtesy Imperial War Museum

Who Gets the Golden Retriever? What You Need to Know About Clients in Non-Traditional Relationships

We love everyone. We don’t want to cause controversy.

photo courtesy of Golden Retriever Club of America   https://www.grca.org/

Who Gets the Golden Retriever? What You Need to Know About Clients in Non-Traditional Relationships

by Linda Eaton

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What is the marital status of couples in your practice? Do they cohabitate? Are they legally married? To each other? Do you know?

As a Financial Advisor, you need to make certain you know the marital status of your clients who are couples. Straight or gay, unmarried couples must pay special attention to their financial affairs if they want their property to pass to their partner.

You, as their FA, must ensure they pay attention. Remember: people who think “it won’t happen to them” are the people “it happens to.”

Here is a classic issue: whoever is named as the primary beneficiary of your IRA inherits the assets in this account no matter what your last will and testament direct. Why? Because the beneficiary designation on your IRA overrides your will. After a breakup or divorce, many people forget to change the primary beneficiary of their IRA’s. Instead of your unmarried partner getting the assets, someone with whom you had unhappy differences decades ago could inherit the largest part of your wealth.

If you die without a will or a trust, then the law says you have died intestate. Your assets will pass to your blood relatives in order of their closeness to you. As with everything, there are exceptions. Remember that state law governs who gets what and each state can have slightly different laws.

One of the most important issues facing non-married couples is ensuring that the property they think of as “their” home is correctly titled in both names. If one partner is the sole owner, and that person dies, the home will not pass automatically to the surviving partner unless the proper documents have been signed. Terrible stories abound of people turned out of what they regarded as their homes for want of clear title or a will which specifically left the property to them.

Perhaps the most difficult issue for any couple is this one: who is authorized to take you off life support if you have suffered from an accident or illness which has left you without measurable brain function and no possibility of recovery? Hopefully, this will not be something your clients will have to confront. Yet, they should plan for it.

You can be of most help to your clients by suggesting they execute the following two documents:
1) a health care proxy (durable power of attorney) for health care decisions, also known as a health care surrogate appointment, or advanced health care directive, is a document that names someone you trust to make health care decisions on your behalf if you cannot.
2) a properly created living will tells your doctor and your hospital which treatment you want if you stop breathing or your heart stops. Among the stipulations can be a “do not resuscitate order.”

As an FA who is a holistic advisor to your clients, you need to recommend they consider making these documents a part of their life planning. Unfortunately, if your clients have not left a properly executed health care proxy or advanced healthcare directive (different states have different terminology) then the person they love the most can’t be involved in carrying out their expressed desires in this situation because the two partners are not legally married.

Finally, who gets your golden retriever? Not clear if you die intestate but if you include directions in your will as to who should get your loyal companion, then the executor of your estate will ensure that person gets your golden retriever.

Contributing Writer: Subject Matter Expert Charles McCain

To learn more about this topic, register for our Certified Wealth Strategist program of study.

Copyright ©2017 Cannon Financial Institute – All Rights Reserved

Subscribe to Cannon Insights at http://www.cannonfinancial.com/newsletter/subscribe

COMMENT FROM CHARLES McCAIN: Cannon Financial Institute is the “gold standard” for wealth management training, development and consulting. I worked at the firm for many years and my colleagues were the most talented people I have ever worked with.  Last year the firm sought me out to write articles for them which I started doing in January of  2016. After a hiatus of nine years, I am pleased to report that my colleagues continue to be the most talented people I have ever worked with and it is a pleasure to be working with them again.  I take them directly from the Cannon website and the links work.  I will post the articles I write for them on my blog after they appear on Cannon’s website. https://www.cannonfinancial.com

Feature photo courtesy of Golden Retriever Rescue of North Texas http://www.goldenretrievers.org/

While Politicians Bluster Our US Navy Is Vigilant and On Patrol Around the World

US Aircraft carrier George h.w. bush in Atlantic Ocean
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ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 8, 2017) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George H. W. Bush (CVN 77) at sea during exercise Saxon Warrior 2017, Aug. 8. Saxon Warrior is a United States and United Kingdom co-hosted carrier strike group exercise that demonstrates allied interoperability and capability to respond to crises and deter potential threats. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Theron J. Godbold /Released)
strike hornet landing on USS george h.w. bush

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 5, 2017) An F/A-18C Hornet assigned to the “Ragin’ Bulls” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 37 prepares to land aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) in the Atlantic Ocean during exercise Saxon Warrior 2017. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael B. Zingaro)

 

aircraft carrier gerald r. ford training in the atlantic
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ATLANTIC OCEAN (July 28, 2017) An F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 flies over USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). The aircraft carrier is underway conducting test and evaluation operations.(U.S. Navy photo by Erik Hildebrandt/Released)

 

“… Americans understand that their Navy is deployed around the world, around the clock, ready to defend America at all times.” U.S. Navy statement.

US AIRCRAFT CARRIER THEODORE ROOSEVELT IN THE PACIFIC

PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 9, 2017) The aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) transits the Pacific Ocean. Theodore Roosevelt is underway conducting a composite training unit exercise (COMPTUEX) with its carrier strike group in preparation for an upcoming deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Austin R. Clayton/Released)

 

uss theodore Roosevelt battle group in the pacific

PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 6, 2017) The Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group (CSG) participates in a strait transit exercise. The aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) is underway conducting a composite training unit exercise (COMPTUEX) with its CSG in preparation for an upcoming deployment.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Anthony J. Rivera/Released)

 

Aircraft carrier uss nimitz in the indian ocean
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INDIAN OCEAN (July 19, 2017) The aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) transits the Indian Ocean. Nimitz is deployed in the U.S. 7th fleet area of operations. The U.S. Navy has patrolled the Indo-Asia-Pacific routinely for more than 70 years promoting regional peace and security. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tyler Preston/Released)

 

aircraft carrier uss nimitz in the bay of bengal
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BAY OF BENGAL (July 17, 2017) The aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) leads a formation of ships from the Indian navy, Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) and the U.S. Navy July 17, 2017 in the Bay of Bengal as part of Exercise Malabar 2017. Malabar 2017 is the latest in a continuing series of exercises between the Indian Navy, JMSDF and U.S. Navy that has grown in scope and complexity over the years to address the variety of shared threats to maritime security in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cole Schroeder/Released)

 

aircraft carrier uss nimitz in asian waters

PACIFIC OCEAN (June 21, 2017) The aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) and the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Princeton (CG 59) conduct a replenishment-at-sea with the fleet replenishment oiler USNS Yukon (T-AO 202). Nimitz and Princeton are on an underway in the U.S. 7th fleet area of operations. The U.S. Navy has patrolled the Indo-Asia-Pacific routinely for more than 70 years promoting regional peace and security. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tyler Preston)

 

USS dwight d. eisenhower in the atlantic maneuvering with Canadian frigate

ATLANTIC OCEAN (June 27, 2017) The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), the guided-missile cruiser USS San Jacinto (CG 56), the dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Robert E. Perry (T-AKE 5) and the Royal Canadian navy Kingston-class maritime coastal defense vessel HMCS Glace Bay (MM 701) transit the Atlantic Ocean. Dwight D. Eisenhower is underway conducting a bilateral group sail with the Canada 150 anniversary celebration. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jessica L. Dowell/Released)

 

aircraft carrier uss eisenhower with an international battle group including guided missile destroyer uss winston s. churchill transiting atlantic
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ATLANTIC OCEAN (June 27, 2017) The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81), the guided-missile cruiser USS San Jacinto (CG 56), the Military Sealift Command dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Robert E. Perry (T-AKE 5), the Royal Canadian Navy frigate HMCS Charlottetown (FFH 339), the Royal Canadian Navy Kingston-class maritime coastal defense vessel HMCS Glace Bay (MM 701) and the Royal Canadian Navy Kingston-class maritime coastal defense vessel HMCS Moncton (MM 708) transit the Atlantic Ocean. The ships are underway conducting a bilateral group sail with the Canada 150 anniversary celebration. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Tony D. Curtis/Released)

 

uss george h.w. bush and battle group passing the rock of Gibraltar in the Mediterranean

 


STRAIT OF GIBRALTAR (July 24, 2017) The aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) passes the Rock of Gibraltar. The ship and its carrier strike group are conducting naval operations in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations in support of U.S. national security interests in Europe and Africa. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael B. Zingaro/Released)

 

us guided missile cruiser uss hue city asserting our right of passage in the international waters of the black sea. We don’t care if putin doesn’t like it.

ODESSA, Ukraine (July 13, 2017) The Ticonderoga class-guided missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) departs Odessa, Ukraine, for the at-sea phase of exercise Sea Breeze 2017. Sea Breeze is a U.S. and Ukraine co-hosted multi-national maritime exercise held in the Black Sea and is designed to enhance interoperability of participating nations and strengthen maritime security within the region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Weston Jones/Released)

 

us navy ships in coral sea working with our Australian allies
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CORAL SEA (July 10, 2017) The Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Shiloh (CG 67), front, the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS McCampbell (DDG 85) and USS Barry (DDG 52) conduct maneuvers during Talisman Saber 2017. Talisman Saber is a realistic and challenging exercise that brings service members closer and improves both U.S. and Australia’s ability to work bilaterally and multilaterally, while preparing them to be poised to provide security both regionally and globally. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class David Holmes/Released)

 

 

FEATURED IMAGE:  ATLANTIC OCEAN (July 8, 2017) The guided missile cruiser USS San Jacinto (CG 56) fires its Mark 45 5-inch gun during a live-fire exercise alongside the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69).  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Neo Greene III/Released)

Churchill Loved His Uniforms

Having begun his adult life as a soldier, Churchill remained keen on uniforms for the remainder of his life and often wore them in the Second World War. He only wore uniforms he was entitled to and his ranks at that point were honorary.

 

Prime Minister Winston Churchill Crosses the River Rhine, Germany 1945
The Prime Minister Winston Churchill crosses the River Rhine to the east bank, south of Wesel, in an American Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel (or Higgins boat) with Field Marshal Sir Bernard Montgomery, Field Marshal Sir Alan Brooke and US General William Simpson on 25 March 1945. (photo courtesy of the Imperial War Museum).

Churchill is wearing the uniform of a Colonel of the 4th Hussars. He was made an honorary colonel of the regiment in 1941. This is the regiment Churchill joined when he passed out of Sandhurst in 1894 and first entered the army.  He entered as a second lieutenant. (Some accounts claim he entered as a cornet, the equivalent rank in the cavalry to 2nd Lieutenant but that rank had been abolished some years before during a series of reforms in the British Army).

 

An exceptionally handsome and slender nineteen-year-old 2nd Lieutenant Winston Churchill of the 4th Queen’s Own Hussars in 1895. (IWM)

Winston Churchill was the first Prime Minister of Great Britain to have served in combat and killed the enemy since the Duke of Wellington, who served as Prime Minister from 1828 to 1830.

 

THE VISIT OF THE PRIME MINISTER, WINSTON CHURCHILL TO CAEN, NORMANDY, 22 JULY 1944 (TR 2050) The Prime Minister, the Rt Hon Winston Churchill, MP, with the Commander of the British 2nd Army, Lieutenant General Sir Miles Dempsey (right) and the Commander of the 21st Army Group, General Sir Bernard Montgomery. Copyright: © IWM.

Churchill is wearing one of his favorite uniforms, that of an Elder Brother of Trinity House. This organization, which recently celebrated its 500th anniversary, is responsible for harbour pilots in the UK and aids to navigation.

When he became First Lord of the Admiralty in 1911, Churchill was made an honorary elder brother of Trinity House, the Elder Brothers being the governing board of the organization.

At the beginning of World War One, Churchill was in France on behalf of the government and was wearing the uniform of an Elder Brother of Trinity House. One of the French officers asked a British officer with Churchill what the uniform signified. In mangled French, the British officer replied that Churchill was a member of the Trinity.

 

Churchill in uniform as honorary Air Commodore.

In 1939 Churchill was appointment by King George VI as an honorary Air Commodore. His wings were later granted as another by the Royal Air Force. Churchill had become a pilot before the Great War and was one of the first licensed airplane pilots in Great Britain.

 


Featured image:

Prime Minister, Mr Winston Churchill  (he is wearing the uniform of an Elder Brother of Trinity House).in conversation with two seated dockers. The conversation took place during Mr Churchill’s tour of the dock area of Liverpool in late September 1941. It was reported that the Prime Minister saw the two workmen having their dinner and, alluding to their well-filled plates, asked: ‘Are you managing to get plenty of food?’ ‘Aye Sir!, we are doing grand, thank you’, was the reply. (Photo courtesy of the Imperial War Museum)

British Troops In Hell at Dunkirk

 

DUNKIRK 1940 (MH 5848) British troops disembarking from a destroyer at Dover after their return from the Dunkirk beaches, June 1940. Copyright: © IWM. 
DUNKIRK AND THE RETREAT FROM FRANCE 1940 (C 1720) Ships off the beaches at Dunkirk, c.3 June 1940. Smoke billows from burning oil storage tanks. Copyright: © IWM.

 

DUNKIRK AND THE RETREAT FROM FRANCE 1940 (C 1717) A Hudson of RAF Coastal Command patrols over Dunkirk, as oil storage tanks burn fiercely in the background, c. 3 June 1940. Copyright: © IWM.

 

Soldiers from the British Expeditionary Force fire at low flying German aircraft during the Dunkirk evacuation. (PHOTO COURTESY OF AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL) This photo is in the public domain and getty images cannot claim as one of their pictures.

 

 

THE EVACUATION FROM DUNKIRK 1940 (HU 73187) A hospital ship carrying wounded soldiers away from Dunkirk. In the background can be seen columns of smoke and flames from fires burning in the bomb and shell shattered port. Copyright: © IWM.

 

THE FALL OF FRANCE IN 1940: GERMAN OFFICIAL COLOUR PHOTOGRAPHS OF DUNKIRK IMMEDIATELY AFTER THE BRITISH EVACUATION (COL 289) German forces arrive in Dunkirk after the completion of the evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force earlier in the day. Clearing the blocked road into Dunkirk. Under the direction of their German captors, French troops push away an immobilised British Universal Carrier tracked vehicle. Copyright: © IWM.

 

THE FALL OF FRANCE IN 1940: GERMAN OFFICIAL COLOUR PHOTOGRAPHS OF DUNKIRK IMMEDIATELY AFTER THE BRITISH EVACUATION (COL 288) German forces arrive in Dunkirk. The sea front at Dunkirk photographed immediately after the completion of the evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force earlier in the day. Vehicles and troops of the German mobile assault unit Motorensturm 13, drawn up on the sea front at Dunkirk near one of the unit’s light anti-tank guns. Copyright: © IWM.

 

DUNKIRK AND THE RETREAT FROM FRANCE 1940 (HU 104614) A woman from the Mechanised Transport Corps (MTC) hands out tea to troops evacuated from Dunkirk at a railway station in the UK, 31 May 1940. Copyright: © IWM.

Dunkirk, France. 1940-05-28. Troops of the British Expeditionary Force lined up on the beach awaiting the arrival of the British Evacuation fleet.

 

DUNKIRK AND THE RETREAT FROM FRANCE 1940 (HU 104604) A paddle steamer, seen from the deck of another vessel, reaches safety at an east coast port during the evacuation from Dunkirk, 2 June 1940. Copyright: © IWM. 

 

DUNKIRK AND THE RETREAT FROM FRANCE 1940 (HU 104607) Some of the ‘little ships’ used during the evacuation of Dunkirk being towed back along the River Thames past Tower Bridge, 9 June 1940. Copyright: © IWM. 

 

Featured Image: As oil storage tanks burn in the distance, a trawler crowded with troops heads from Dunkirk back to England, June 1940. Imperial War Museum

Fleet Air Arm Protecting Convoys

THE ROYAL NAVY DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR (A 22308) Protection for convoys is one of the jobs of the Fleet Air Arm planes of the Royal Air Naval Station, Sierra Leone. Here a Boulton Paul Defiant from the station sweeps over a big convoy which is just leaving Freetown Harbour. The aircraft took off from from HMS SPURWING, Royal Naval Air Station in Sierra Leone, once a stretch of untouchable bush. Part of the wings and struts of the biplane from wh… Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205016128

 

THE ROYAL NAVY DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR (A 22306) Two of the station’s Boulton Paul Defiant aircraft in flight after taking off from HMS SPURWING, Royal Naval Air Station in Sierra Leone, once a stretch of untouchable bush. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205016127

 

 

THE ROYAL NAVY DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR (A 7869) A Fairey Fulmar returns to HMS VICTORIOUS after doing patrol during a Home Fleet convoy to Russia. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205185619

Escorting convoys to Russia was a brutal task given the terrible weather and constant attacks by German aircraft and U-boats out of Norway. Home Fleet provided “distant cover” since fleet carriers like HMS Victorious and battleships such as KGV were too valuable to risk anywhere close to German air attack. Home FLeet distant cover was laid on in the event the Tirpitz came out.

THE ROYAL NAVY DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR (A 22312) A Fairey Fulmar aircraft of the Fleet Air Arm about to take off from HMS SPURWING, a Royal Naval Air Station in Sierra Leone, on a coastal reconnaissance. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205186969

The Royal Navy named all of its bases as if they were ships. Hence, HMS Spurwing was a Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm base providing cover for convoys forming up off Freetown, Sierra Leone, a major convoy destination point where escorts changed.

The Royal Navy did most of its accounting by ship so it was easier to keep track of everything if all bases were treated as ships. For instance, unassigned officers were carried on the books of HMS Victory although they were obviously not on the ship itself although it did have accommodation for a small number of officers in transit.

If you wrote someone in the Royal Navy in World War Two, you addressed the letter to that person followed by name of ship followed by GPO, London.

 

THE ROYAL NAVY DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR (A 6123) A Fairey Fulmar being flagged off from the flight deck of HMS VICTORIOUS at Scapa Flow. The carrier’s island can be seen in the background. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205185487

 

THE ROYAL NAVY DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR (A 6120) A Fairey Fulmar taking off from the flight deck of HMS VICTORIOUS at Scapa Flow. Two more of the aircraft can be seen at the end of the flight deck. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205185486

The two photographs above are unusual because they show planes both landing and taking off from the Royal Navy fleet carrier HMS Victorious while the carrier is at anchor in the Royal Navy Home Fleet anchorage of Scapa Flow.

Because of aerodynamic reasons, carriers in World War Two typically had to turn into the wind which gave added lift to planes taking off.  As an aircraft carrier neared its anchorage, the planes based on the carrier took off while the carrier was still at sea and could turn into the wind and flew to a Fleet Air Arm base on land.

They usually practiced landing on a carrier deck by landing on runways on land marked with the length of a carrier deck. Aircraft carrier pilots then and to this day often describe landing on a carrier as a “controlled crash.” It isn’t and wasn’t for the faint of heart.

In the last few years, the US Navy has started to fly drones from aircraft carriers which calls in question our naval strategy based around massive aircraft carrier battle groups. This is according to defense writer and expert Thomas Ricks, not me.

THE ROYAL NAVY DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR (A 6955) A Fairey Fulmar warming up on the flight deck of HMS VICTORIOUS. Note the Donald Duck painted on the nose of the plane. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205185544

 

THE ROYAL NAVY DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR (A 7003) Sub Lieutenant (A) M Bennett, RNVR, in the cockpit of his Fairey Fulmar on board HMS VICTORIOUS. Note the art work on the nose of the aircraft. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205185552

RNVR means Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve. Officers wore wavy stripes on their coat sleeves instead of regular stripes worn by professional “regular service” officers. Hence known as “wavy navy.” Nonetheless, RNVR officers came to vastly outnumber the regular service officers of whom there were only about 5,000 when the war began.

RNVR officers who were pilots assigned to the Fleet Air Arm wore a small insignia denoting this. The men claimed the small insignia was meant to inform all other RN personnel that they knew absolutely nothing about the navy.

THE ROYAL NAVY DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR (A 7279) In the hangar deck of HMS VICTORIOUS at Hvalfjord, Iceland a row of Fairey Fulmars is flanked on either side by two rows of Fairey Albacores, all with their wings folded. The photograph was taken around the time of the search for the TIRPITZ. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205185573

Hvalfjord was a treacherous anchorage because it was exposed to vicious winds. Ships at anchor normally dropped both bow and stern anchors which they usually didn’t do in more protected anchorages as well as keep steam on since they often had to make revolutions for two or three knots simply to stay where they were and not drag their anchors if a storm came up.

THE ROYAL NAVY DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR (A 5950) The forward part of the flight deck of HMS VICTORIOUS with Fairey Fulmars and Fairey Albacores on board during preparations for Norwegian operations. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205185479

 

THE ROYAL NAVY DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR (A 7540) A bearded Fleet Air Arm gunner, Leading Airman C H Clark, from Tadworth, Surrey, exits his Fairey Albacore aircraft carrying his flying kit, after his aircraft returned from a patrol to HMS VICTORIOUS off the coast of Iceland. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205185586

 

Featured image shows: Fairey Albacores, the torpedo carrying plane of the Fleet Air Arm landing on the deck of HMS VICTORIOUS while the ship was en route to Hvalfjord, Iceland from Scapa Flow. The automatic Bat can be seen in the right of the picture, as can the arrestor wires running across the flight deck.