Bee Stings Drive Russian Soldiers to Madness

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Bee Stings Drive Russian Soldiers to Madness

Bee Stings Drive Russian Soldiers to Madness

Bee stings are hell

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Russian soldiers in World War Two uniforms prepare to march through Red Square
(photo courtesy Financial Times)
“Must be drunk, Herr Oberleutnant. They’re dancing around like lunatics.”

Bee Stings Drive Russian Soldiers to Madness. While retreating through Rumania in World War Two, sentries for a German unit notice something very odd going on in a nearby village occupied by Russian troops. For reasons unknown, the Russian soldiers had suddenly begun to dance around like fools.

German troops, peeking out of their foxholes, started laughing as the Russian troops in the distance run around like they were had become insane. The jumped up and down, rolled on the ground, swatted themselves all over.

 

Russian Soldiers in Frontline Trench

Russian Soldiers Jumped Out of Their Foxholes Shrieking

Most of the Russians began shouting so loudly the sound carried as far as the German lines and the German troops doubled up with laughter. Incredibly, the Russian soldiers manning the defense perimeter along the side of the village facing the Germans, jumped out of their foxholes, shrieking, and waving their arms in the air.

Are the Russians drunk the Germans wonder?

All of a sudden…

a bunch of Russians are running directly toward us as if they are being chased by the very devil. As they’re running they’re flapping their arms all about, as if trying to fly.”

The German soldier who witnessed this was just about to open fire with his machine gun when his officer told him to hold fire because the Russians were unarmed.

Swarms of mad bees torment the Russian soldiers

The Ivans ran madly through the German lines, leaped over German foxholes while they flapped their arms and shrieked. A swarm of mad bees had attacked the Russian soldiers and stung them so many times they would do anything to get away, even throwing down their firearms and running in the direction of the German lines.”

(Source: Blood Red Snow: the Memoirs of a German Soldier On the Eastern Front by Gunther K Koschorrek)

 

Russian soldiers dressed in Red Army World War II uniforms prepare to parade in Red Square in front of a backdrop of St. Basil Cathedral in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. Thousands of Russian soldiers and military cadets marched across Red Square to mark the 72nd anniversary of a historic World War II parade. The show honored the participants of the Nov. 7, 1941 parade who headed directly to the front lines to defend Moscow from the Nazi forces. The parade Thursday involved about 6,000 people, many of them dressed in World War II-era uniforms. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

Russian soldiers dressed in Red Army World War II uniforms prepare to parade in Red Square in front of a backdrop of St. Basil Cathedral in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. Thousands of Russian soldiers and military cadets marched across Red Square to mark the 72nd anniversary of a historic World War II parade.  (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

(Courtesy of London Financial Times)

Red Army Soldiers Brutalized in World War Two

Red Army soldiers in World War Two were constantly brutalized by their environment, their bestial Nazi enemy, the terrifying and exceptionally bloody engagements in which they fought, and their constant fear of being shot by their own side if they didn’t perform bravely.

NKVD troops usually formed “blocking detachments” behind Russian combat troops. If the combat troops tried to retreat or run in the face of a German onslaught, the NKVD troops mowed them down.

While historians differ as to the exact number, approximately 200,000 Soviet soldiers were shot in WW Two after very brief courts martial.

women served as medics in Red Army combat units

By | 2019-02-12T11:29:01-05:00 February 14th, 2019|Charles McCain, Russia, Third Reich, World War Two, ww2, wwii|0 Comments

About the Author:

Charles McCain is a Washington DC based freelance journalist and novelist. He is the author of "An Honorable German," a World War Two naval epic. You can read more of his work on his website: http://charlesmccain.com/