World War Two Women Pilots Take Control to Help Great Britain

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World War Two Women Pilots Take Control to Help Great Britain

Britsh Air Transport Auxiliary

“During the years of the Second World War a short lived, but remarkable, organisation existed. The Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA) was a civilian service that was tasked with the delivery of aircraft from factories to the squadrons of the RAF and Royal Navy and the delivery of supplies. Featuring pilots exempt from wartime service due to health, age and gender they gained a reputation for being able to take anything to anywhere.”

from: RAF MUSEUM/air-transport-auxiliary

 

THE AIR TRANSPORT AUXILIARY IN THE SECOND WORLD WAR (CH 8945) Allied women pilots of the Air Transport Auxiliary service. Their job done, four female ATA pilots (three Americans and one Polish) leaving an airfield near Maidenhead, 19 March 1943. They are from left to right: Roberta Sandoz of Washington; Kay Van Doozer from Los Angeles; Jadwiga Pilsudska from Warsaw; and Mary Hooper from Los Angeles. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205193567

 

168 women in seperate squadrons flew aircraft of all types for the Air Transport Auxiliary. Many could fly as many as thirty-eight different types of airplanes and eleven qualified to fly heavy four engine bombers. The ATA and a similiar organization in the US were started because of the pressing shortage of qualifed male pilots fit to fly combat against the Germans.

 

 

While the majority of the female pilots were British or from the Commonwealth, pilots came from many different countries. Pictured above are three American pilots and a Polish pilot.  

THE AIR TRANSPORT AUXILIARY IN THE SECOND WORLD WAR (CH 8945) Allied women pilots of the Air Transport Auxiliary service. Their job done, four female ATA pilots (three Americans and one Polish) leaving an airfield near Maidenhead, 19 March 1943. They are from left to right: Roberta Sandoz of Washington; Kay Van Doozer from Los Angeles; Jadwiga Pilsudska from Warsaw; and Mary Hooper from Los Angeles. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205193567

 

 

ROYAL AIR FORCE TRANSPORT COMMAND, 1943-1945. (CH 14155) RAF and WAAF air ambulance orderlies of the Casualty Evacuation Unit at Down Ampney, Gloucestershire, relax round the stove in their Nissen hut while waiting to take off on a casevac flight to Europe. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205210625

On the job: An ATA pilot performs the final checks in the cockpit of her Percival Proctor at Thame

(photo courtesy of Getty Images via London Daily Mail)

 

 

On the runway: Captain Joan Hughes at the controls of a Lockheed Hudson bomber in September 1944. After the War ended, the Londoner went on to become the UK’s first female test pilot and was given an MBE in 1946.

(photo courtesy of Getty Images via London Daily Mail)

 

 

On her way: First Officer Faith Bennett signs a collection chit for the new Spitfire pictured at a factory airfield

(photo courtesy of Getty Images via London Daily Mail)

 

 

Strapping in: A pair of ATA pilots help each other adjust their parachutes in a photo dating from 1943

(photo courtesy of Getty Images via London Daily Mail)

 

You can read more about the women of the Air Transport Auxiliary at the London Daily Mail here:

dailymail.co.uk/-female-Guns-World-War-II-Inside-RAF-s-woman-ferry-squadron-

 

Display photo from Getty Images via London Daily Mail: First Lieutenant Maureen Dunlop sits at the controls of her Spitfire fighter plane in September 1944

By | 2018-11-19T20:58:27+00:00 November 19th, 2018|Charles L McCain, Charles McCain, McCain, RAF, World War Two, ww2|0 Comments

About the Author:

Charles McCain is a Washington DC based freelance journalist and novelist. He is the author of "An Honorable German," a World War Two naval epic. You can read more of his work on his website: http://charlesmccain.com/