Dunkirk British Army Retreats from Germans

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Dunkirk British Army Retreats from Germans

DUNKIRK 1940 (HU 1524) British troops during the evacuation from Dunkirk, 1940. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205260329

 

DUNKIRK 1940 (HU 1528) British troops in the sand dunes at Dunkirk, 1940. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205222016

Comments Charles McCain: while regular army and elite regiments such as the those comprising the Brigage of Guards, held together, support units and formations of untrained reservists sent over from the UK tended to break under the intense stress of conducting a fighting retreat. Officers sometimes abandoned their men and men sometimes abandoned their officers.

Many people take a certain pleasure in condeming the French for collapsing in World War Two. It bears pointing out that the French rearguards at Dunkirk fought off the Germans until all British and French troops waiting to evacuate could be withdrawn. Only then did they surrender to the Germans.

 

DUNKIRK 1940 (HU 1531) British troops in the sand dunes at Dunkirk, 1940. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205260322

 

DUNKIRK 1940 (HU 1520) British troops during the evacuation from Dunkirk, 1940. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205260326

 

 

DUNKIRK 1940 (HU 1137) Men of the 2nd Royal Ulster Rifles awaiting evacuation at Bray Dunes, near Dunkirk, 1940. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205086985

DUNKIRK 1940 (HU 1519) British troops during the evacuation from Dunkirk, 1940. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205260324

 

DUNKIRK AND THE RETREAT FROM FRANCE 1940 (HU 1530) An officer rests in a trench dug into the sand dunes at Dunkirk, May 1940. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205227524

Comments Charles McCain: the sand tended to absorb a portion of the explosion of German bombs. Second, while sharpnel from bombs could be deadly, it blows out and up and not down. If you were in a trench, you were usually safe from bombs and sharpnel unless they landed on top of you.

DUNKIRK 1940 (HU 1529) British officers in a trench dug into the beach at Dunkirk, 1940. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205086988

 

DUNKIRK 1940 (HU 1152) Rescued troops on board the destroyer HMS Vanquisher, May 1940. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205222774

 

DUNKIRK 1940 (HU 1147) A lifeboat with survivors from the Isle of Man steam ferry SS Mona’s Queen, mined off Dunkirk, comes alongside the destroyer HMS Vanquisher, 29 May 1940. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205222770

DUNKIRK 1940 (HU 1148) A lifeboat with survivors from the Isle of Man steam ferry SS Mona’s Queen, mined off Dunkirk, comes alongside the destroyer HMS Vanquisher, 29 May 1940. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205222771

By | 2017-12-15T15:17:59+00:00 December 15th, 2017|BEF, Charles McCain, CMcCain, McCain, naval history, ww2, ww2 history, wwii|0 Comments

About the Author:

Charles McCain is a Washington DC based freelance journalist and novelist. He is the author of "An Honorable German," a World War Two naval epic. You can read more of his work on his website: http://charlesmccain.com/