Her Battlecruiser Scrapped Before New Zealand Repaid Loan

 

Indefatigable class battle cruiser HMS New Zealand berthed at Outer Harbour, South Australia. HMS New Zealand, carrying Lord and Lady Jellicoe, arrived at Outer Harbor, Port Adelaide, on 25 May 1919, having sailed from Fremantle via Port Lincoln. HMS New Zealand sailed for Melbourne in the early hours of 28 May 1919.  Photo and caption courtesy of the State Library of South Australia.

“In March 1909, New Zealand’s Prime Minister, Sir Joseph Ward announced that ‘the Dominion’ (New Zealand) was offering ‘the Motherland’ (Britain) the ‘free gift of … a first-class battleship’. ‘Should later events show any need for it,’ Ward continued, ‘New Zealand will offer again a second warship of the same class.’

Parliament authorised the expenditure of up to £2 million, spread over 18 years, on the ‘gift ship’. The ship’s construction began in early 1910, and was completed in November 1912, she having been given the name HMS New Zealand in 1911. The ship participated in the Battle of the Dogger Bank on 28 January 1915, took part in the great Battle of Jutland.”

Unfortunately, warship design had proceeded far ahead since 1912  and HMS New Zealand was obsolescent by the end of the war. In December 1922, she was sold for scrap and broken up in Scotland.

“Long after her scrapping, New Zealand continued to pay for her, with the last payment on the loan raised to build her not being made until the 1944/45 financial year.”

text in quotes from website of the  Museum of New Zealand

 

HMS New Zealand steaming during the Battle of Heligoland Bight  

                         (official Royal Navy photo courtesy of the Imperial War Museum)

“Two symbolic garments had been presented to the ship by a Maori chieftain, after a suitable war dance, with the warranty that the great grey canoe would come to no harm in battle as long as her captain we wearing them. The items were a greenstone pendant known as a tiki, and a sort of rush mat apron, called a piu piu, to be worn around the waist…”

 

While not the one presented to HMS New Zealand, this is photo from the National Museum of New Zealand of a typical Maori piu piu 

Prior to the Battle of the Dogger Bank the captain of the New Zealand had worn both items and the ship sustained no damage. At Jutland, Captain Green, newly in command wore the tiki pendant “but was too stout to wear the piu piu without discomfort, so he just kept it close at hand ‘ready to put on if things became too hot.’ ” (text in quotes from: The Rules of the Game by Andrew Gordon).

The ship was hit once at Jutland by a German shell which caused no casualties. The piu piu is now in the Museum of the Royal New Zealand Navy.

Photograph of assembled officers of HMS New Zealand (1911-1922) together with HM King George V and Mr. Winston Churchill, First Lord of the Admiralty. Source unknown.

 

http://collections.tepapa.govt.nz/topic/1049

 

 

Published by

Charles McCain

Charles McCain is a Washington DC based freelance journalist and novelist. He is the author of "An Honorable German," a World War Two naval epic. You can read more of his work on his website: http://charlesmccain.com/