tirpitz 5

German Navy (Kriegsmarine) battleship Tirpitz anchored in far northern Norwegian fjord. The floats mark the anti-torpedo netting which surrounded the ship.

Known as the “Queen of the North,” the mere fact that the Tirpitz could come out of her lair and attack Allied convoys to Russia was a constant drain on Royal Navy ships until RAF Bomber Command was finally able to sink the ship after repeated attempts. On 12 November 1944, British strategic bombers struck the battleship twice with 12,000-pound bombs. She rolled over and sank.

The “Queen of the North” was a sister ship to the Bismarck. Ironically, as much fear and difficulty she caused, the ship only fired her main battery in anger once.

 

(German Battleship, 1941-1944) Camouflaged at her moorings in the Flehke Fjord, Norway, during World War II. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

(German Battleship, 1941-1944) Camouflaged at her moorings in the Flehke Fjord, Norway, during World War II. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

 

German Battleship, KMS Tirpitz 1941-1944), photographed in Norwegian waters in 1942-44. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

German Battleship, KMS Tirpitz 1941-1944), photographed in Norwegian waters in 1942-44. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.