World War II Posters

Other WWII Propaganda Poster posts

Another series of US Home Front posters. These urge Americans to buy war bonds and stamps. Like all governments, the United States had to borrow money to prosecute the Second World War and one of the best sources of that money were the citizens of the US. Immense effort was made to entice people into investing their savings in various types of war bonds both because the country needed the money and as a way to ‘soak up’ the additional money people began to make working in war industries. From a nation with high unemployment and high “under-employment” the US went quickly to full employment and even labor shortages as war production geared up. Because few consumer goods were being produced, the government was eager to divert the new income streams American workers had into savings to avoid rapid price inflation with the classic “too much money chasing too few goods.” This strategy was relatively successful.

Because many Americans had never purchased an investment instrument before, extensive public education was required. Special efforts were made, for the very first time, to reach out to the African-American community which had very little contact with the banking industry. Many African-Americans and other persons of color had their first interactions with banks and the financial system through the purchase of war bonds.

Title: Save for security : buy defense savings stamps here.
Date: 1941.
Agency: United States. Dept. of the Treasury.
Title: Buy a share in America : defense savings bonds and stamps /
Date: 1941.
Agency: United States. Dept. of the Treasury.
Title: Buy a share in America : United States defense bonds.
Date: 1941.
Agency: United States. Dept. of the Treasury.
Title: For defense buy U.S. savings bonds and stamps : on sale at your post office or bank.
Date: 1941.
Agency: United States. Dept. of the Treasury.

[Images courtesy of Northwestern Digital Library.]

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Charles McCain

Charles McCain is a Washington DC based freelance journalist and novelist. He is the author of "An Honorable German," a World War Two naval epic. You can read more of his work on his website: http://charlesmccain.com/

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